fur-garance-dore

I liked the conversation we had the other day about fur.
First, I want to say that I felt like for once, this subject was able to be discussed without anyone losing it.
It’s quite rare to have a real conversation about fur on the internet. Unless you love angry tweets thrown your way, we all tend to avoid it.

This time around, everyone came together with a huge amount of a respect, so thanks to all of you.

After reading through your very interesting comments (I learned a lot. If you ever have questions about fur, I recommend that you go through them too), I think I have put my finger on what I think about fur.

Before we get to that though, let me say a few things about how I got here.

I’m not a vegetarian. I grew up in a family where we ate a lot of vegetables and some meat. We’d buy meat at the very best butcher in town and when it was there, we really took time to taste it.

My father is a restauranteur and a chef.

He cooked meat – but especially fish. I remember in our restaurant, we had a lobster tank with live lobsters and when a client would order one, my father would have to fish one out and take it alive to the kitchen. I could hear the lobster squealing in his hands.

And then he’d grab a huge knife and cut it in two, still alive.

It was pretty shocking for a child but I grew up in a village with cows and goats and chickens and at times when we’d have to kill them and eat them.
I’ve seen animals be killed many times. It’s sad and fascinating at the same time.

Later on, I stopped trusting meat. First there was the mad-cow scare, but now that I’ve moved to the States, I’m weary of the hormones used in meat and how the animals are raised and what kind of effect that eating all that could have to my health.

I’m more conscious of what I eat.

When I’m asked if I’d like chicken on an airplane, for example, I think about just how many people in the world are offered the same dinner, and then I imagine the millions of chickens. And then I think about how those chickens are raised and then yikkkessss.
I’ll have the pasta please.

So yeah, I don’t eat meat very often these days, and only when I know where it comes from.

I think I’m much less conscientious when it comes to what I wear though. I like leather a lot. I find it a sensual fabric, I just like it.
Most of the time, I don’t stop and think a second about where that leather pair of shoes, that bag, or those leather shorts for $200 I found last time I was at Topshop are made.

But I mean, leather has to come from some place too, you know?

So back we come to fur.

I haven’t always loved fur. Back in Corsica a pretty warm country, I didn’t see a lot around me.
Plus in the 90s, there was that anti-fur campaigns led by top-models (some of whom wear fur today, but that’s another subject), and I think it had a real effect. Fur became totally outdated.

You’d see it on older women, like a time-capsule of past fashions.
It was charming, but obsolete.

And then suddenly bam! Fur is back.
I started thinking it was really beautiful. I’d get pictures of people in it. I wore some myself, vintage, mind you, but not because of any kind of conviction. I never thought the argument that “Oh, it’s vintage” made the wearer somehow more respectful.
For me, fur is fur, end of story.

Little by little, I started seeing it everywhere, all price ranges, on all the girls.

Then one day, during a fashion week, right in front of a show, my stomach just didn’t feel right.
I don’t know what got me, maybe something about the amount of furs per square foot or something (both on the catwalks and on the street) suddenly made my heart ache — a little like the chicken on the airplane.

It was the first time in a few years that I stopped and thought about fur. It takes time to form an opinion on stuff like this, since we live in a society where killing animals for food and clothing has been around since the dawn of time.

And it’s hard too to be totally clear on what you decide. Because if one day I decide that I’m against fur, that’ll also mean that I’m against leather and that Chateaubriand steak from Paper Moon (eeeeek).

I struggle to understand why people’s radical ways of thinking don’t get pushed to its logical conclusion.

That’s one of the reasons why I admire Stella McCartney so much.
So pushes her ideas through.

Reading your comments helped me understand what my position is for the moment.

What gets me is not the life and death of animals – as a human being raised in the culture I was raised in, philosophically, I can live with that.
What bothers me is how things are done.

An endangered animal, big no. An animal living a miserable existance (we’ve all seen the horrible images of animals being beaten in cages) is the last thing I want to be feeding and clothing me.

A farm animal raised and slaughtered with respect, I’m not against that.

But the other thing to is not only how things are done on the producer’s side, but how we do it on the consumer side.

I want to learn to have more respect for what I consume.

What I always think is interesting with the older women I talked about a few paragraphs ago is the relationship they have with their furs. Most of them treat their fur as something they’d keep for life. Sure, it’s an exterior symbol of wealth, but it’s also considered a treasure, an heirloom to be cherished and only brought out for the most important moments.

But today, we always want more, something new, something cheaper, and a season later we forget what we liked the season before.

It’s too bad, because there’s a real joy in moderation.
Think of having only one watch, like Charlotte and her Baignoire from Cartier. Or a bag that’s your signature, like Grace and her Kelly. Timeless stuff that lives on.
And maybe, if you really want one, a fur, that you’ll cherish for the years to come, bought from a respectful furrier…

I’m not saying we all need to become nuns – I’m the first to go off about the merits of Zara and less expensive clothing (not even mentioning the whole conversation about the conditions of how some of these clothes are made, otherwise we’d have a whole new thing going here), which makes all these other arguments a little hypocritical…

A little like the fur conversation.
But what’s so strong about fur is that it’s visually striking. A visibility that makes us react. And that’s a good thing!
We have to start somewhere.

So that’s where I stand. I respect other points of view, whether you are for or against fur – and I have even more respect for those who ask themselves questions about everything, and ask me questions too!

Personally, I don’t think I’m ready to buy a fur, but I wouldn’t have the hypocrisy to congratulate myself about it – because I’m not ready to replace my leather shoes or bags with synthetics either.

I’m not going to stop shopping at Zara anytime soon but just on a personal level, I’ve already started a while back trying to buy less and not promote the whole “all new, all the time” thing on this blog and elsewhere.
Yes, we talk about fashion, but also about style, and classic pieces you can keep for decades to come.

For me, that’s true fashion… It’s style and style is timeless.
And to me, that is a key role for the luxury industry to play in the years to come.

I’ll try to evolve, to really reflect on things and I hope we can continue our conversation about fashion but also about sustainability, all together and with respect, because there will be no future to style, beauty, and fashion if there aren’t beautiful people standing up and asking questions.


You may also like

  • My Faux Coat
    Style
    My Faux Coat
  • These Shoes (And Me)
    Style
    These Shoes (And Me)
  • Le Manteau De Carine
    Style
    Le Manteau De Carine
  • Prada
    Style
    Prada

249 comments

Add yours
  • andreea March, 18 2013, 9:20

    yes: style not fashion! :)

    http://littleaesthete.com

  • CORY SCOTT March, 18 2013, 9:20

    I wasn’t exactly raised with live animals around me, but I agree with you 100%!

    ??? PARIS-NEW YORK FASHION BLOG! ???
    THE DEEP BLUE CORY Fashion blog
    THE DEEP BLUE CORY Facebook Page
    Xoxo Cory

  • Marie (une autre) March, 18 2013, 9:23 / Reply

    Sagesse, quand tu nous tiens… ;)

  • Jane with the noisy terrier March, 18 2013, 9:24 / Reply

    A thoughtful and considerate post.

  • Suite 910 March, 18 2013, 9:28 / Reply

    Je partage ton opinion sur le fait qu’il est difficile de faire dans la demi-mesure pour cette question. Se positionner contre le fait de porter de la fourrure mais porter du cuir et manger de la viande n’est pas logique.
    J’aime beaucoup ce que propose Stella Mc Cartney. En revanche j’ai beaucoup de mal à acheter du synthétique, j’ai l’impression d’acheter quelque chose qui ne deviendra jamais un classique, quelque chose que je pourrais garder des années, de mauvaise qualité. Le prix auquel Stella Mc Cartney vend ses chaussures en simili cuir ( est ce du simili cuir ou utilise-elle une technologie à part?) ne m’y pousse pas vraiment non plus. Pourquoi mettre le prix d’une belle paire de chaussure en cuir dans une paire en plastique, qui surement ne survivra pas bien longtemps?

    Merci pour ton post,

    Laetitia
    http://suite910.com/

  • Monsieur J March, 18 2013, 9:28

    Est-ce que le synthétique est plus étique?
    C’est vrais ça on parle de fourrures et du cycle de production, mais le synthétique c’est du pétrole…!

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 9:28

    Bonjour!

    Personnellement, je suis végétarienne et ne porte pas de fourrure mais j’achète du cuir pour les chaussures parce que je considère que, comme il y a davantage d’animaux tués pour leur viande que pour leur peau, autant utiliser l’animal en entier. Je n’en achèterai pas si cela incluait davantage de morts d’animaux.

    Je me permets de copier-coller la réponse de V. que j’ai trouvé très claire et intelligente :

    Une petite précision nécessaire je trouve : même si moi je suis aussi végétarienne je fais une nette distinction entre la fourrure, le cuir et la viande. En effet les modes de production ne sont pas les mêmes du tout et il suffit (mais il faut beaucoup de courage) de voir quelques vidéos de production de fourrure sur internet pour s’en rendre compte. Les bêtes destinées à la boucherie sont abattues tout d’abord avec un pistolet électrique. Même si il y a des ratés, elles sont sensées être inconscientes au moment de l’égorgement et de l’ouverture de leur corps. Le cuir est un sous-produit de cette industrie. Tandis que la fourrure se fait dans une autre chaîne de production. Elle est arrachée le plus vite possible du corps de la bête car elle ne doit pas être souillée. Beaucoup de vidéos montrent de ce fait des animaux encore vivants dont la peau est littéralement arrachée – et c’est également le cas lorsqu’il s’agit d’animaux « de ferme », comme des lapins, car encore une fois il s’agit d’une chaîne de production spécifique.
    Il n’est donc pas tout à fait correct de comparer le végétarisme et « l’abstention de fourrure » comme on peut l’appeler.
    Sans compter que les élevages de fourrure sont aujourd’hui des élevages industriels dans lesquels des animaux, pour la plupart sauvages (renards par exemple) sont élevés en batterie dans des conditions difficilement compatibles avec l’esprit si doucement civilisé qui bruisse dans les rangs des défilés. J’ai des souvenirs visuels très désagréables de renards tapis de peur dans le fond de cages métallisées de toutes parts et dont la mort par électrocution par l’anus (désolée mais c’est comme ça) apparaît comme une délivrance. Je vous invite vraiment à regarder quelques-unes de ces vidéos, car la réalité y est très percutante.
    Bref, tout cela pour dire que l’industrie de la fourrure est tout à fait particulière. Si particulière que les Pays-Bas par exemple viennent de voter l’interdiction de la production de fourrure sur leur sol.
    Quoi qu’il en soit merci pour cette discussion. Et vive Stella, une belle femme dans tous les sens du terme.

  • Elisa March, 18 2013, 9:28 / Reply

    Une belle argumentation, Garance. Au fond, tout se rejoint. Il n’y a pas de mal a consommer (que ce soit viande, fourrure, cuir ou meme vetements Zara), a condition que cela soit fait en mode ‘degustation’, plutot que boulimie.

    Elisa – Wandering Minds fashion
    ourwanderingminds.com

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 9:28

    Bonjour!

    Personnellement, je suis végétarienne et ne porte pas de fourrure mais j’achète du cuir pour les chaussures parce que je considère que, comme il y a davantage d’animaux tués pour leur viande que pour leur peau, autant utiliser l’animal en entier. Je n’en achèterai pas si cela incluait davantage de morts d’animaux.
    D’autre part, je crois qu’il est plus facile de s’abstenir d’acheter de la fourrure que de manger de la viande. C’est pour cela que je n’ai pas de jugement sur ceux qui en consomment. Même si évidemment, j’encourage tout le monde à en manger moins et mieux! :-)

    Je me permets de copier-coller la réponse de V. que j’ai trouvé très claire et intelligente :

    Une petite précision nécessaire je trouve : même si moi je suis aussi végétarienne je fais une nette distinction entre la fourrure, le cuir et la viande. En effet les modes de production ne sont pas les mêmes du tout et il suffit (mais il faut beaucoup de courage) de voir quelques vidéos de production de fourrure sur internet pour s’en rendre compte. Les bêtes destinées à la boucherie sont abattues tout d’abord avec un pistolet électrique. Même si il y a des ratés, elles sont sensées être inconscientes au moment de l’égorgement et de l’ouverture de leur corps. Le cuir est un sous-produit de cette industrie. Tandis que la fourrure se fait dans une autre chaîne de production. Elle est arrachée le plus vite possible du corps de la bête car elle ne doit pas être souillée. Beaucoup de vidéos montrent de ce fait des animaux encore vivants dont la peau est littéralement arrachée – et c’est également le cas lorsqu’il s’agit d’animaux « de ferme », comme des lapins, car encore une fois il s’agit d’une chaîne de production spécifique.
    Il n’est donc pas tout à fait correct de comparer le végétarisme et « l’abstention de fourrure » comme on peut l’appeler.
    Sans compter que les élevages de fourrure sont aujourd’hui des élevages industriels dans lesquels des animaux, pour la plupart sauvages (renards par exemple) sont élevés en batterie dans des conditions difficilement compatibles avec l’esprit si doucement civilisé qui bruisse dans les rangs des défilés. J’ai des souvenirs visuels très désagréables de renards tapis de peur dans le fond de cages métallisées de toutes parts et dont la mort par électrocution par l’anus (désolée mais c’est comme ça) apparaît comme une délivrance. Je vous invite vraiment à regarder quelques-unes de ces vidéos, car la réalité y est très percutante.
    Bref, tout cela pour dire que l’industrie de la fourrure est tout à fait particulière. Si particulière que les Pays-Bas par exemple viennent de voter l’interdiction de la production de fourrure sur leur sol.
    Quoi qu’il en soit merci pour cette discussion. Et vive Stella, une belle femme dans tous les sens du terme.

  • Chaussette March, 18 2013, 9:29 / Reply

    Je suis toujours partagée… De toutes façons, je ne trouve pas cela beau.

  • caroline March, 18 2013, 9:36 / Reply

    Encore une fois merci Garance : venir sur ton blog c’est comme prendre un café avec une copine intelligente qui aurait toujours envie de parler d’un sujet qui t’intéresse…bref un plaisir toujours renouvelé et qui fait réfléchir…MERCI

  • Monsieur J March, 18 2013, 9:39 / Reply

    Merci pour cette réponse.
    Pour ma part, tout est une question de consommation, si on doit réfléchir à chaque achat, c’est le casse tête, une amie et sa petite famille on fait un an sans made in china (http://coutureetgourmandises.eklablog.com/un-an-sans-made-in-china-c17346912/2).
    La question est surtout en ai-je besoin? Ce qui réglera déjà bien des choses.

    PS: La vie est faite d’exception.

  • Musa March, 18 2013, 9:39

    J’aime bien Monsieur J ton commentaire. (oui, je te tutoie, j’espère que ça ne choque personne? ;)) Et je te rejoins: l’important, c’est la conscience dans ce que l’on fait ; ce n’est pas avoir des principes rigides et des airs de pape.
    Il y a toujours en effet des exceptions dans la vie.
    Gardons-nous donc des points de vue extrêmes…

  • Rachelle March, 18 2013, 9:40 / Reply

    Very well said, and great illustration. I am fine with faux fur, in my opinion fur is unecessary.

    xo
    http://pinksole.com

  • Kabie March, 18 2013, 9:41 / Reply

    Bravo pour ce post, Garance. Honnête, vrai, et nuancé. J’ai adoré le lire jusqu’à la toute dernière ligne!

    Un bonjour de Montréal!

    kabinmontreal.tumblr.com

  • Erwan March, 18 2013, 9:47 / Reply

    excellent article. Je pense que tu as fait le tour des questions. Il y a bien sûr le sort final de l’animal mais aussi toutes ses conditions de vie comme les conditions de vie des travailleurs (des enfants ?) qui vont du synthétique. La question de la fourrure n’est pas si simple et il y a de nombreuses choses qui m’échappent mais tu m’as donné envie de lire attentivement les commentaires de l’article que, lui, j’ai lu.

    A+
    http://www.so-trendy.fr/

  • suky March, 18 2013, 9:47 / Reply

    wow. that was the best article about fur I ever read.
    totally agree.

  • Annika Tibs March, 18 2013, 9:50 / Reply

    I love this post Garance!

    I completely agree with you and have had the same internal dialogue with myself regarding, fur leather and so on… I believe this comes down to peoples knowledge as a whole, rather then just piecemeal information on one aspect (i.e. fur is bad) but not taking into consideration all the other dynamics associated and more importantly the over consumption of… “things” in general, which is a whole other beast to talk about.

    I have lived in NYC for almost 3 years now, originally from Vancouver. My biggest concern about moving to the states was the quality of meat, veggies,, fruit etc…. food! The American food industry is toxic and I am not saying Canada is far different as many of the same products are sold there too. However, similar to you I grew up with a little meat which we bought directly from a local butcher where the farm was literally behind the shop. The animals live happily, well treated, fed and die respectfully. There is a distinct difference in taste between an all natural meat and factory farmed (that word alone is scary) Sooo needless to say, since moving here I made a choice for myself to not eat meat.

    In respect to fur, I own fur from a DVF sample sale and those same thoughts about the airplane run through my mind. I wear it and I love it but there is that internal conversation going on… For me I dont intend to own one for every season. I’ve always seen fur as a one of’ that becomes a timeless piece in ones closet.

    X

  • E. March, 18 2013, 9:52 / Reply

    ‘It takes time to form an opinion’: yes it does, and thank you for sharing your reasoning!

  • Cécile March, 18 2013, 9:53 / Reply

    Première fois que je commente ici mais je dois dire que le sujet m’intéresse tout comme j’apprécie la façon dont tu l’abordes (et encourages à l’aborder): respectueuse, honnête et tolérante. Je dois dire que tu as dit presque mot pour mot ce que je ressens par rapport à tout ça: on ne peut plus désormais ignorer ce qui se passe à ce niveau et comment les choses se passent. La mode est une chose, et je l’aime également mais accepter pour autant l’inacceptable (traitement ignoble des animaux, races en voie de disparition…) ne me paraît pas digne des humains responsables que nous devrions essayer d’être, aujourd’hui plus que jamais, et avant d’avoir atteint le point de non-retour. Comme toi, je pense qu’un début de solution viendra de la modération et du ralentissement de la consommation, ne pas vouloir toujours plus et à moindre coût si possible. Car finalement c’est de cette évolution-là que sont nés les dérives et les abus que nous connaissons tous désormais. Je me remets comme toi en question car, si je refuse d’acheter de la fourrure, je n’en aime pas moins le cuir. Donc je ne suis pas jusqu’au-boutiste (à tort, d’ailleurs, peut-être) mais tente de raisonner: moins pour mieux. Je pense que c’est la règle d’or pour un futur moins chaotique.
    Bravo en tous cas de permettre la discussion,, première étape essentielle pour l’éveil des consciences.
    Bonne continuation!

  • kt mo March, 18 2013, 9:59 / Reply

    THIS WAS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL POST.

    Seriously, one of the most well written, thought out pieces i’ve ever seen on your site or ANY site!

    i love your attitude – what irks me is when people say, Well i already eat meat so why think about this any further? Because! Because ALL the things you do have consequences and value, and whatever you decide is absolutely a valid choice, but not if it’s not a decision you actively, consciously make. Not if you just refuse to think about it.

    Also! my favourite beauty site JUST posted an article in a very similar vein and i think it’s fascinating and wonderful and exciting that stylish, beautiful, smart women are starting these conversations. Read it if you have the time: http://www.xovain.com/makeup/eu-animal-testing-ban

  • Clochette March, 18 2013, 10:00 / Reply

    Ça fait un an que je suis progressivement devenue plus écoresponsable, et maintenant 99% végétarienne, et même ayant considérablement baissé ma consommation de produits laitiers et d’oeufs. Même bio, oui. Je suis en train de réfléchir au port de cuir tout ça, mais surtout parce-que j’ai déjà assez de chaussures que j’adore et qui me suffiraient pour pas mal d’années. J’adore l’idée d’acheter des pièces qui vieillissent bien, d’ailleurs mon dernier achat, en seconde main, d’une paire de pirate boots noires me fait sauter de joie! C’est vraiment pas facile de renoncer à tous ces plaisirs par pur altruisme et compassion (j’adore la viande, le fromage encore plus, j’adore porter du cuir, des UGG), le chemin est tellement long que perso je ne juge personne. Parce-qu’à moins d’être vegan et écolo à fond (c’est-à-dire non consommateur à moins absolue nécessité), personne n’est irréprochable. Parce-que le pire, effectivement, c’est sûrement ce tee-shirt zara marinière qui ne survit pas 3 lavages. Compliqué tout ça, j’admire aussi beaucoup Stella, mais en même temps, c’est plus facile quand on a été éduqué comme ça (merci papa Paul).
    En tout cas je vois de lus en plus de monde prendre conscience et changer, doucement. Mais c’est vraiment un sacrifice quotidien.
    Une petite vidéo, à voir en entier, parce-qu’au début, le gars semble être un allumé extréniste, et au final, on se dit que l’extrémisme, c’est nos habitudes de consommation! C’est en anglais sous-titré français, parfait pour toutes tes lectrices du coup :)

  • elodie March, 18 2013, 10:01 / Reply

    et bien moi je dis bravo pour cet article !

  • Maddy Marcel March, 18 2013, 10:01 / Reply

    Garance, thanks for hosting that discussion, which I agree was very thoughtful and respectful! And thanks for sharing your feelings here.

    What you said about buying luxuries with the intent of keeping them for life went straight to my heart! I hate the extreme disposability of our culture. It’s not the way I was raised, it’s terrible for the planet, and in the long run, it’s a really wasteful way to spend money.

    So I agree, let’s recognize that things do *not* have to be “all new, all the time” … you’re doing a great job of communicating that with your new “Things I Can Do Right Now” series, by the way, I love it! And, for sure, being just a little less consumerist does not mean giving up fashion! (Quelle hoereur!!) On the contrary, learning to buy a little more slowly, a little more deliberately, and treasure what we have is THE way to live a more stylish, more beautiful, and a more fulfilled life.

    big hugs

    MM

    big hugs

    MM

  • Clochette March, 18 2013, 10:02 / Reply

    J’arrive pas à copier/coller. Bon c’est sur youtube, “le discours le plus important de votre vie-Gary Yourofsky”, pour ceux que ça intéresse.

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 10:02

    Bouleversant!
    Merci Clochette!!!

  • laura.carolina.baer@gmail.com March, 18 2013, 10:02

    Merci pour le lien! Très intéressant.. et en effet, même si cela est vrai.. les habitudes sont difficiles à changer. Pour ma part, j’évite mais je n’arrive pas à éliminer tout ceci. Et le plus “challenging”, c’est de le faire comprendre à son entourage…

  • Elisa Marie March, 18 2013, 10:02 / Reply

    What a thoughtful piece! I really appreciate your honesty, and your level-headed contemplation of the different elements at play: ethics, aesthetics, economics. Your opinions resonate with me. I especially like that you connect the particular issue of fur to the broader issue of how we consume. I agree that our relationship with the items we possess is important; I am trying to be a more thoughtful consumer myself– and I think both my mind and my wardrobe are the better for it!

  • Molly Benn March, 18 2013, 10:04 / Reply

    Tout à fait d’accord ! Cet hiver je suis allé chez un fabriquant de sabots pour me faire faire une paire sur-mesure, des bottines, que je n’aurais que cet été… Elle va me coûter un bras, mais j’aurais choisi le cuir, les couleurs, l’artisant y aura passé du temps et de l’amour (de son travail)…et je sais déjà que ces chaussures je vais les aimer pour la vie :)
    http://mode.ourageis13.com/

  • Goldie March, 18 2013, 10:04 / Reply

    Je suis bien d’accord avec tout ca, surtout en ce qui concerne la consommation effrénée de Zara et de poulet. Je trouve hallucinant que certaines personnent aillent faire du shopping CHAQUE week-end. Comment est-ce même possible? La consommation à grande échelle, ca me débecte. Bonne semaine!

  • roberta March, 18 2013, 10:05 / Reply

    Garance, tu as déja acheté une fourrure (ou mieux, c’est Scott qui l’as fait, mais c’est la meme chose): ton parka Mr et Mrs Fur, qui est effectivement une fourrure…

  • Lisa March, 18 2013, 10:07 / Reply

    Bonjour,
    Entièrement d’accord avec Caroline, c’est toujours un plaisir de vous lire! Et ce post soulève des questions très intéressantes. Récemment, j’ai eu une prise de conscience en regardant un documentaire sur l’industrie du textile (effrayantes conditions de travail) et j’ai maintenant envie d’adopter un mode de consommation tempéré et pièces indémodables, centré sur des produits plus luxueux. Mais il est très difficile de trouver des infos sur les modes de production des différentes maisons de luxe. Avez-vous des informations sur ce sujet? Merci d’avance, ce blog est fabuleux et très drôle!

  • Marie Lgdc March, 18 2013, 10:07 / Reply

    Tout ça est très bien écrit et je suis totallement d’accord!

    Malheureusement on ne saurra jamais d’où le cuir et la fourrure proviennent …
    Car même si le cuir a été produit et traité au Bengladesh par un adolescent sans protections, si les chaussures ont été confectionnée en Italie, alors ça sera du made in Italie.
    De même pour la fourrure les étiquettes n’indiqueront jamais que l’animal était vivant lorsqu’on lui a arraché la peau …
    Bref je suis vraiment d’accord les chaussures en cuir je ne suis pas prête à y renoncer,
    mais la fourrure soyons honnete, on n’est plus des hommes des caverne on n’a plus besoin de ça pour se réchauffer. Et l’idée de porter un animal mort pour faire joli sur ma capuche? non merci!

    http://marielgdc.blogspot.fr/

  • Nymphéa March, 18 2013, 10:07

    Je suis totalement d’accord avec toi et j’ai “renoncé” à bien des manteaux pour cause de fourrure non amovible sur la capuche!

  • Serdane March, 18 2013, 10:09 / Reply

    La fourrure restera pour la mode un sujet de louange et de tabou. C’est beau, c’est gracieux et on se sent tout de suite en hiver quand on le porte. Son problème c’est que ça tue des animaux pour des mauvaises raisons. Mais pour pallier à ce problème, je pense qu’il faudrait porter de la fausse fourrure et tout les deux ans.

    http://www.younglington.wordpress.com

    http://www.thefashionmellow.tumblr.com

  • Bleu Poplar March, 18 2013, 10:13 / Reply

    I think what’s really important here is that you’re being very honest.
    There’s a good lesson in here and I think people can make better decisions as soon as they start thinking for themselves. It can also make their style timeless ;)
    Thanks for sharing!

    http://bleupoplar.com/

  • Edith March, 18 2013, 10:15 / Reply

    You named it, Garance, That’s exactly what I think about leather/meat/fur, too. I’m looking forward to read more posts about sustainability and fashion. Because I love love love fashion – but I love the world, too.

  • Elke March, 18 2013, 10:15 / Reply

    Thank you, Garance, for this contemplative post. I take a similar stance – I don’t mind the death of animals, as long as it isn’t needlessly cruel and they enjoyed a worthy life. I think our consumer behaviour – concerning food, fashion, whatever – entails a lot of tragedy and suffering. It’s nigh impossible to ban all destructive habits (I certainly have a hard time doing so), but the first step is questioning ourselves and raising a discussion. I think if anyone can inspire young women to rise above themselves when it comes to these issues, it’s you. All thanks to your wise, good-hearted, modest tone of voice. That’s a huge talent.

  • ClaraB March, 18 2013, 10:19 / Reply

    Je partage ton point de vue!!! Les positions radicales sur ce sujet sont souvent difficiles à garder! L’ouverture et l’esprit critique nous éloignent des dérives destructrices ….

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 10:19

    Bonsoir!

    Ne pas torturer les animaux, est-ce que ça peut être une dérive destructrice?

    Personnellement, je suis végétarienne et ne porte pas de fourrure mais j’achète du cuir pour les chaussures parce que je considère que, comme il y a davantage d’animaux tués pour leur viande que pour leur peau, autant utiliser l’animal en entier. Je n’en achèterai pas si cela incluait davantage de morts d’animaux.

    Je me permets de copier-coller la réponse de V. que j’ai trouvé claire et très intelligente :

    Une petite précision nécessaire je trouve : même si moi je suis aussi végétarienne je fais une nette distinction entre la fourrure, le cuir et la viande. En effet les modes de production ne sont pas les mêmes du tout et il suffit (mais il faut beaucoup de courage) de voir quelques vidéos de production de fourrure sur internet pour s’en rendre compte. Les bêtes destinées à la boucherie sont abattues tout d’abord avec un pistolet électrique. Même si il y a des ratés, elles sont sensées être inconscientes au moment de l’égorgement et de l’ouverture de leur corps. Le cuir est un sous-produit de cette industrie. Tandis que la fourrure se fait dans une autre chaîne de production. Elle est arrachée le plus vite possible du corps de la bête car elle ne doit pas être souillée. Beaucoup de vidéos montrent de ce fait des animaux encore vivants dont la peau est littéralement arrachée – et c’est également le cas lorsqu’il s’agit d’animaux « de ferme », comme des lapins, car encore une fois il s’agit d’une chaîne de production spécifique.
    Il n’est donc pas tout à fait correct de comparer le végétarisme et « l’abstention de fourrure » comme on peut l’appeler.
    Sans compter que les élevages de fourrure sont aujourd’hui des élevages industriels dans lesquels des animaux, pour la plupart sauvages (renards par exemple) sont élevés en batterie dans des conditions difficilement compatibles avec l’esprit si doucement civilisé qui bruisse dans les rangs des défilés. J’ai des souvenirs visuels très désagréables de renards tapis de peur dans le fond de cages métallisées de toutes parts et dont la mort par électrocution par l’anus (désolée mais c’est comme ça) apparaît comme une délivrance. Je vous invite vraiment à regarder quelques-unes de ces vidéos, car la réalité y est très percutante.
    Bref, tout cela pour dire que l’industrie de la fourrure est tout à fait particulière. Si particulière que les Pays-Bas par exemple viennent de voter l’interdiction de la production de fourrure sur leur sol.
    Quoi qu’il en soit merci pour cette discussion. Et vive Stella, une belle femme dans tous les sens du terme.

  • Dariann March, 18 2013, 10:19 / Reply

    Garance, you maintain a respectful position on this argument. You’re not extreme in either direction, but you do have a conscientious perspective. I especially love your commentary on your upbringing and experience in your father’s restaurant. It always helps to understand how people formulate their opinions when you know more about where they came from.

  • Andrea March, 18 2013, 10:23 / Reply

    Vous l’avez dit Garance: Une (bonne) fourrure c’est pour la vie.
    C’est un très bon débat auquel j’ajouterais volontiers mon grain de sel.
    Voila: avec le premier gros argent que j’ai gagné de toute ma vie je me suis offert un vison. Je vis dans un pays où il fait froid, humide, mauvais. Tous les hivers je voulais me suicider. A un moment donné (pour mes 21 ans) j’ai décidé que je devais trouver de l’argent pour m’offrir un vison, ce que j’ai fait.
    J’ai un beau vison de bonne qualité (ce qui veut dire que sa peau n’est pas trop abrasée de l’intérieur ce qui le rend un peu lourd mais très chaud). Quand il fait froid, rien ne remplace la fourrure. RIEN.

    Maintenant pour ce qui est de la viande, cela fait des décénies que à la maison nous ne mangeons environ qu’un steak par mois (avant il y a eu des décénies où pas de steak du tout). Je ne mange jamais d’agneau, lapin ni autres animaux mignons. J’ai totalement arrêté le homard quand j’ai su qu’ils souffraient dans la marmite. Je ne mange pratiquement plus de poisson par solidarité avec les poissons, car je trouve que les laisser agoniser sur le pont d’un bateau est dégoûtant. Bref pour faire court je ne mange qu’un minumum de poulet et que des poulets de ferme élevés en plein air, et un peu de canard de temps en temps.

    Certaines personnes disent que la fourrure est inutile alors que la viande pour la nourriture est utile. On sait très bien que c’est faux. Je pense que pointer du doigt la fourrure comme le font certains extrémistes et juste de la discrimination raciale d’animaux: pourquoi serait-ce dégoûtant de les tuer pour la fourrure et non pour la viande.
    Je pense que la fourrure pour toutes sortes d’ornementations est inutile. Le rôle de la fourrure est de protéger du froid. Les Uggs c’est super aussi quand il fait froid (!)
    Il y encore trop d’animaux sur terre qui souffrent.
    Je fais atention absolument à tout ce que je consomme mais chaque hiver quand il fait glacial et que je ne ressens aucun inconvénent du froid grâce à mon manteau, je suis super contente. Touchons du bois, je n’ai jamais eu de remarque déplaisante. Mais il est vrai que cette année je me suis achetée une doudoune pour les endroits où il vaut mieux ne pas se montrer en vison….

  • Cecilia March, 18 2013, 10:23 / Reply

    J’aime bien ce post Garance. Et je voudrais pouvoir te répondre en Italien, pour mieux exprimer mon opinion. On aime toutes la mode, mais moi aussi je commence a me interroger si nos achetons ce qui nous aimons vraiment ou ce qui nous vient proposée par l’industrie du luxe ou par les journaux ou par notre boutique préféré. Quand je étais très jeune je étais beaucoup plus indépendante. Je vais écrire un post sur ce sujet. Merci Garance pour tes réflexions.
    http://modeskinen.blogspot.com

  • Cohiba March, 18 2013, 10:25 / Reply

    C’est drôle, Garance, parce que très souvent, lorsque tu publies un nouveau billet, celui-ci est complètement en phase avec mon état d’esprit du moment. Ce sont des coïncidences vraiment très agréables.
    Le désir de simplicité que tu exprimes ici, l’envie de se libérer de ce consumérisme ambiant est exactement ce que je ressens moi aussi. Du coup, (n’étant pas à une contradiction près), j’ai commencé par jeter mon dévolu sur deux modèles Signature du site d’Equipment l’autre jour. C’est agréable de se dire que l’on a dans son dressing des pièces qui traversent le temps, qui sont de belle qualité. Et cela, ça passe forcément par un minimum de sobriété.
    Donc, the question is : la fourrure peut-elle être sobre et classique ? Je pense que oui, si l’on choisit un modèle dans des tons neutres. Cela dit, Kate Moss a réalisé la prouesse de faire de la fourrure léopard une pièces classique qu’elle ressort elle-même tous les ans.

    Moi aussi je me pose la question de la provenance des fourrures que j’ai achetées. J’avoue que cela m’effleure rapidement et l’esprit et qu’aussi rapidement, j’écarte le problème en me disant que je n’ai pas fini de me tourmenter si je m’interroge sur la provenance de tous les vêtements et accessoires que je possède et qui sont fabriqués dans des matières animales.
    En quoi serait-il contraire aux règles d’éthique de porter une veste en fourrure plutôt que des escarpins, un sac ou un pantalon en agneau ? Qu’est-ce qui me garantit que l’agneau en question a été mieux traité que le renard ou le vison qui a servi a confectionner cette veste ?
    Franchement, l’hostilité à l’égard de la fourrure va bien au-delà du seul souci de respecter la sensibilité animale, sinon, les anti-fourrure souvraient la même ligne cohérente que Stella McCartney dont tu parles très justement et banniraient aussi le cuir et la peau et ne mangeraient pas de steacks.
    Tu remarqueras, Garance, que porter un manteau ou une veste en shearling ne suscite pas particulièrement de réprobation dans le regard des gens, tandis qu’une veste en vison, oui. Pourquoi ? Je pense que cela provient des représentations associées traditionnellement à la fourrure. C’est une matière luxueuse. Dans les décrets vestimentaires au Moyen Âge, seuls les nobles étaient autorisés à la porter. Probablement les regards chargés de reproche auxquel on a droit lorsque l’on porte du vison ou du renard trouvent-ils leur origine dans cet inconscient collectif qui veut que la personne ainsi vêtue est perçue soit comme une représentante d’une classe dominante, soit comme voulant imiter cette classe.
    En d’autres termes, si l’on porte de la fourrure, on se situe symboliquement du côté des puissants, des oppresseurs. En bref, on est un salaud. Je ne suis pas si certaine, au bout du compte, que la question du respect des animaux soit centrale là-dedans.

  • zuperserena March, 18 2013, 10:25

    La difference avec le shearling, je crois, c’est qu’on assume que l’animal est tué pour le manger, et plusieur de gens crois que manger de la viande est necessaire pour se nourrir. Il y a de gens que ne mange pas de la viande, mais elles croient que la peau des animaux qui les autres mangent est disponible, et pourquoi pas l’utiliser? La chose qui est choquant est tuer pour la peau, et non pour manger. C’est la meme chose pour le cuir. On assume que l’animal et tue pour le manger, et le cuir est un subproduct. Alors, je sais que ca n’est pas le cas vraiement, et que plusieurs de vaches son eleves seulment pour le cuir, pour moi c’est un decouverte trop neuf (cet an). (Desolee pour me francais, j’espére que je peux me faire comprendre)

  • Cohiba March, 18 2013, 10:32 / Reply

    J’ajoute : le comble de l’hypocrisie et de la stupidité est le terme “fourrure écologique”. Comment ose-t-on qualifier d’”écologique” une matière synthétique, et donc polluante ?
    C’est une inversion totale des valeurs : le naturel (la vraie fourrure) serait anti-écologique, tandis que le non-naturel serait écologiquement correct. Cherchez la contradiction…
    Il y a un business de l’écologie, et l’hostilité à la fourrure est aussi une façon d’alimenter ce fonds de commerce.

  • caro March, 18 2013, 10:33 / Reply

    Je suis partagée, comme toi Garance, d’un côté j’adore le côté sensuel et chaud de la fourrure et un sentiment de vêtement intemporel qui m’attire et de l’autre côté je n’ai pas envie de cautionner un abattage et un élevage à grande échelle de certains animaux qui sont tellement beaux dans la nature et pas sur nos dos… pour moi le lapin est comme le cuir, cette fourrure provient des lapins qu’on consomme, mais pareil, combien de lapins faut-il pour faire un blouson? c’est comme ton plateau de poulet… en tout cas merci d’aborder les sujets d’une manière si honnête et si sincère, je trouve ça réconfortant et positif!
    BRAVO! et un grand merci pour ton blog qui reste une grande source d’inspiration pour tous les jours!

  • So proud to read you Me March, 18 2013, 10:38 / Reply

    superbe et je suis vraiment heureuse de ce merveilleux blog post. Oui et oui et oui! tellement d’example:
    Les bjoux fantaisies ca contient des horribles trucs qui ne se recycle pas….moi ca me fait reflechir.

    Je suis passee a Patagonia et franchement en mode c’est pas ca mais leur approche et leur philosophie me donne envie de porter que ca du patagonia: je respecte les origines et notre espece dois consommer mieux et moins.

    Bravo et merci!

  • Jo March, 18 2013, 10:39 / Reply

    I have to say I was bothered by how much fur was on the runways this season, used in ways that I felt were maybe a bit excessive and disrespectful. I think fur is really beautiful but I’m not sure it’s always worth the cost, so this tainted my enjoyment of the shows. Thanks for a really interesting and well reasoned post Garance. <3

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 10:40 / Reply

    Dear Garance, that’s a fantastic post! I love Corsica, been there several times, it’s so beautiful!

    We seem to be at similar points regarding the fur question, I wouldn’t buy a fur coat but I love my leather shoes and bags and I own a fur collar. I think the question of sustainability is vital in our time and I’m thinking a lot of this subject lately. I think what our grandmothers did, fashion wise, was very wise and I try to buy less but better quality. I think it’s also easier when you have a certain age, when you have more or less found your personal style, then you can invest in quality pieces that last for decades more easily, you know what you love and you know that you will still love it in 10 years. I’m not where I want to be yet, still buying things that I regret after a couple of weeks… but it’s getting better and the more I try to be aware, the more I choose wisely. xxx

  • Kristie March, 18 2013, 10:41 / Reply

    These are all topics that weigh heavy on my mind. A few years ago I began watching videos from factory farms, leather, and fur makers and hence became vegetarian. I have since started eating meat, but try to only buy organic, free range.

    Although I do now believe that fur is something I do not want to support–I try not to feature any fur on my blog…well, there is one picture of Carolina Herrera, Jr. looking positively striking in a red lip (sorry)– I can understand how people find it beautiful. Yet, if the public actually saw how these furs were procured, we might have a different issue on our hands.

    But, I too buy leather and have a hard time rectifying it in my head. I suppose some leather is a by-product from the meat industry, but much is not. And that is really no different than fur, really. I wish leather alternatives that were beautiful (at a fair price) would become more available.

    I also worry about our obsession with consumption in the blog world…I question if I am contributing to this (albeit on a much smaller level than larger bloggers). I can see how the constant diet of disposable goods begets a desire for more, more, more.

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts on a complicated issue and giving something for all of us to think about.

  • Christine March, 18 2013, 10:42 / Reply

    Je crois qu’il y a un shift graduel vers le minimalisme et la simplicité volontaire. L’information est plus publicisée et accessible, et nous sommes heureusement capables d’être plus conscients des effets de la surconsommation, tant dans la mode que dans l’alimentation. Nous ne sommes pas obligés de tous être végétaliens ou végétariens, mais si on pouvait tous faire des choix plus censés, le monde serait meilleur. C’est donc la même chose pour la mode. J’applique cela dans ma vie personnelle et je ne pourrais être plus heureuse. Comme tu le dis, c’est chic de posséder qu’une seule montre, un seul bracelet, que l’on chérit et que l’on porte tous les jours. Ils deviennent nos symboles, ils nous représentent. C’est une charmante idée! Pour ma part, les manteaux de fourrure, ce n’est pas mon genre, mais je ne dirais pas non à un beau col. J’émets des réserves quant à l’éthique, mais comme toi, j’aime le cuir et ai du mal à acheter des souliers de matériaux synthétiques vu que j’achète pour porter longtemps. Cuir, fourrure, quelle différence?

  • Margot March, 18 2013, 10:47 / Reply

    Idem, c’est mon premier commentaire ici. la fourrure déchaîne les passions!
    Je suis heureuse de ton post Garance pour la raison suivante: je suis pour ma part très écolo (végétarienne, traque du gâchis, militantisme etc.) et, bien qu’aimant la beauté qui se dégage de ton blog, j’étais attristée de l’éloge de la consommation qui à mon sens s’en dégage (mais sans me permettre de critiquer dans les commentaires pour autant) (le fait que tu prennes sans cesse l’avion, que tu évoques des bons jus de fruits à emporter dans des verres en plastique, ou juste ce déballage de vêtements). Et j’étais tout particulièrement attristée par la publicité que tu as pu faire pour Zara, dans la mesure où, avec Greenpeace, nous avons milité contre le mode de production de leurs vêtements, qui contiennent divers produits toxiques (phtalates, colorants cancérigènes etc.) y compris pour le consommateur, mais surtout pour ceux qui les fabriquent. A titre personnel ce post me fait donc plaisir et je t’en remercie!
    Quant à la fourrure, je pense qu’on peut en porter pour de bonnes raisons (quand on habite en Sibérie, par exemple, enfin qu’il fait très froid, et pas pour décorer son sac à main!), et à condition de respecter l’animal.. Mais que de façon générale il faut consommer moins et mieux. J’ose espérer, toujours à titre personnel, que tu le rappelleras de temps en temps pour éveiller les consciences, mais cela demeure bien entendu TON blog et je ne t’embêterai plus!
    Cordialement

  • Ingrid March, 18 2013, 10:48 / Reply

    Muchas gracias Garance por ser tan franca en tus opiniones. Es muy importante que con el gran poder de convocatoria de tu blog ayudes a concienciar a la gente de lo importante que es ” tirar el hilo de cada cosa que compramos”. He trabajado varios años como veterinaria de grandes animales, vacas, cerdos y ovejas y llevo años trabajando como agente de varias marcas de moda, y, si como carne pero, no mas de dos veces a la semana y siempre carne ecologica. Estoy totalmente en contra de las granjas de cria intensiva que son autenticos campos de concentración para animales. Respecto a las pieles estoy totalmente en desacuerdo, comer es una necesidad, podemos abrigarnos con muchas otras cosas que no sean pieles animales. Las condiciones en que viven estos animales son tan tremendas que nada las justifica.
    Enhorabuena por vuestro blog

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 10:49 / Reply

    ….. one more thing….. a question: Is there a thing like a “fur label” that allows to know, that the fur is from a place where the animals are treated well before they get killed and that the killing itself is as quick as possible? Would love to know if there is a thing like that, does anyone know?

  • HR March, 18 2013, 10:49

    Dear Gabrielle,

    If the thought of fur from wildlife, not endangered seal, hunted by the Inuit of Greenland for their fur and meat alike, does not put you off, then the furhouse Great Greenland is worth a look.

    For some of the money my father left me, when he died years ago, I purchased the most wonderful sealskin (or do you call it ‘fur’ in English?) jacket. I’ve worn it for 10 Danish winters now, never feeling too hot or too cold (and feeling only mildly disapproved of when I forget the anti-fur stance elsewhere and wear it on occasional winter visits to Germany!)
    Already my 13 year old daugther is keen to ‘inherit’ and wear it. I am glad to think that she will be, even if it’ll be after my own passing!

    For me that’s responsible, sustainable luxury.

    Best regards,
    Helle

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 10:49

    Thank you HR, I was asking this not because I want to buy a fur but just to know. The thought that the animals are free and then shot in the wildlife does not put me off, it’s for sure better than most animal farms. I think there should be a label that all fashion labels take part of, a label that guarantees a good as possible treatment of the animals, if there isn’t something like that, it might be a good thing to invent. Fur was used and will be used, so the use should be made as human a s possible. Might do some further research on this….

  • Jen March, 18 2013, 10:54 / Reply

    Wonderful, thoughtful, and elegant response to the fur inquiry. Bravo Garance. :)

  • Denisa March, 18 2013, 10:55 / Reply

    You wrote it really great and that illustration is so nice. Have a nice monday.

    http://www.fashiondenis.com/

  • Linda Lou March, 18 2013, 10:57 / Reply

    This extremely well-thought out and well-written piece shows you have an impressive heart and mind in conjunction with your long admired eye.

  • Lady ID March, 18 2013, 11:00 / Reply

    I’m Nigerian so I definitely grew up eating meat and wearing leather. The concept of vegetarianism was fairly foreign to me – I had one cousin who was and it was definitely unusual. A lot of the meat back home was free range, etc but that has been changing. I know my mom is particular about eating the free range, organic, non-hormone fed meat. For me, I prefer to eat organic when I can but I am still an omnivore and wear leather. I actually do not like leather substitutes – I would rather buy a quality item and take care of it without worrying about if it is biodegradable.

    My attitude about it is similar to yours in that I am more conscious of the choices I make, and also it’s about the process by which they are made. No endangered animals, sustainable farming, etc.

    It’s not restricted to animals though, when we talk about avoiding fur and meat because of the poor animals, I hope we also think more about the clothes we wear and who makes them (when they have that information).

  • A March, 18 2013, 11:06 / Reply

    I love you! This is by far the most wellwritten and wise blig entry I’ve read in quite a while. And fot those who’d like to know why Stella Mc Cartney doesn’t use leather, here’s a film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldr0-jMCznM

  • simona March, 18 2013, 11:08 / Reply

    You voiced my exact opinion. And me too, I have the thought a lot lately thinking about by example all the chicken served of all the leather bags I see. There is no need for radicalism, but if we all consumed less and more in a conscious way our food, animals, even our wellbeing would improve. Thanks Garance for this!

  • Cilou March, 18 2013, 11:09 / Reply

    Je commente pour la première fois… Je trouve le fait d’etre végétarien un peu extrême , mais concernant la provenance de nos animaux je te rejoins complètement. Depuis un an nous avons 4poules chez moi (donc 4oeufs par jour, utile) et a les voir gambader avec 500m2 chacune la batterie me donne encore + envie de vomir qu’avant….
    Ensuite il est certain que si on continuait le débat sur l’avion (qui reste néanmoins le moyen de transport le moins polluant au km!) sur la provenance de nos ananas….il faudrait revoir toutes notre alimentation.
    Merci pour ton blog :)

  • Ola March, 18 2013, 11:09 / Reply

    Garance,
    thank you so much for that post. I enjoy reading fashion blogs (or mainly looking through them) to get some inspiration and ideas how to wear things and what to buy (and not to buy). I am not all part of the ‘fashion world’, but just feel better and more confident while looking good and generally appreciate style and beauty. So this is kind of background, and the point is…
    Sometimes when I look through some new stylizations with 1000 new pieces everyday I just start feeling really weird. Uncomfortable. Like “’really, is it so amazing that you bought another 1000 new things made of leather/plastic/whatever, you gonna wear them once (or 10 times) and then turn into rubbish. Really? Materials had to be somehow gathered and transported, then with use of energy and water (and work of somebody paid really little and in a place where usually no environmental law is in force) turned into those pieces and then transported all the way here so that you can wear it once? Please’.
    I mean, we all like beauty and style but we are also (I guess most of the readers here) just smart, grown-up people! I don’t needed to be treated like a child or being winked at… I know that it’s a fashion blog, not a political or environmental one, but still.. Fashion has also impacts, cloths are done by somebody somewhere of something and it doesn’t hover somewhere above the real world and its problems.
    Thank you again for this post, asking questions is a great and important skill and I’m really grateful that you touch also less comfortable topics on your blog and don’t pretend such issues don’t exist. And thank you for all the other funny, smart and cute posts as well!
    Best,
    Ola

  • Fashion Snag March, 18 2013, 11:11 / Reply

    I loved reading your thoughts on fur and leather!

    http://www.FashionSnag.com

  • eva March, 18 2013, 11:11 / Reply

    I do not wear fur, not because of moral issues but because of my association with a dead animal.

    When I wear leather it doesn’t remind me of the animal as much as fur. If I have fur in my face, and especially if it gets wet, that feeling and smell reminds me of an animal. If it would be alive I wouldn’t be disgusted, but it is dead, it just feels odd… especially since I have a cat with wonderful soft fur, it is so weird to feel the same touching a fur coat, like I would touch my dead cat. It somehow doesn’t evoke a warm or good feeling.

    Like for meat and leather, if it is raised in a responsible way, I am not against it at all.

  • A March, 18 2013, 11:11

    I think you’re absolutely right. To find leather from happy animals is very, very rare though. Organic small farm meat, yes. Organic small farm leather… not so much. Most of the leather comes from India (where all cows are not sacred, these leather cows are being beaten, chili pepper in their eyes, tails broken etcetera and even in the US, cows are being treated really cruel. Like… de-horning without painkillers. And sometimes even skinned alive. I wish there was a bradn that made happy cow-leather fashion!

  • eva March, 18 2013, 11:11

    I am very happy, that people like you make me aware of these things, so I will think twice next time I look for leather, or think about where it is from.

    However, I also experienced that the skin of animals is often thrown away because maybe there is not enough need for leather as there is for meat, or it is not the cheapest one to get cause it is i.e. from europe. Of course that doesn’t make the crime undone that is happening to the cows, which is terrible. I think this is a whole different thing to what I ment in the other comment, but more like Garance described: treating life respectful. this includes for me responsible care of animals, no stressing and killing them brutally, as well as if we kill them, to use what the animal gives as efficiently as possible, and not to throw away anything. Furthermore, to understand that animal products are something precious, which we should not just consume but value. The same is true for animals used in research.

    Besides all of this, I simply do not fancy fur on myself, but if you would wear it, it would be fine for me, as I think it is your decision. (and again, knowing insights like yours help the decision making process :) )

  • eva March, 18 2013, 11:11

    :) PS.: forget the most important after all: absolutely, I would love to know of such a brand! I think it is so frustrating that one cannot really keep track on where things are from. even expensive ones or ones bought locally can be made from “unhappy” items…

  • anacoluthe March, 18 2013, 11:14 / Reply

    Comme tu le dis, il faut bien commencer quelque part, et la fourrure est la partie visible de l’iceberg…

    Mais cette réflexion sur la mode durable, on pourrait l’avoir sur tant de choses dans notre société… Je n’en peux plus, par exemple, de devoir changer de portable, d’ordi, de machine à laver, de télé, etc, tous les 3 ans !

    Et tout ça parce que ces produits ont une obsolescence programmée, ou qu’ils ne sont pas réparables, ou que leur version est trop vieille, ou qu’un nouveau format est apparu…

    Acheter, jeter, racheter… et au passage créer des déchets dont on ne sait plus quoi faire, ça me paraît tellement absurde ! Surtout qu’il y a les conditions de productions – comme pour la mode – avec le problème des conditions de travail, et celui de la production des matières premières (le coton si gourmand en eau ; les métaux rares de nos portables, provoquant des conflits en Afrique…)

    Mais heureusement, je crois qu’on est beaucoup à frôler l’overdose du nouveau, aujourd’hui… les choses vont changer, il me semble !

  • Roxanne March, 18 2013, 11:15 / Reply

    Merci beaucoup pour ce positionnement. Je te trouve très sage. Je comprends totalement ton point de vue. Tout comme toi, je ne dirais pas que je manque beaucoup de viande. Il y a quelque chose qui me dérange dans le fait de savoir que cette viande et l’animal de lequel elle provient a vécu une vie misérable. Maintenant, j’ai la chance de pouvoir acheter ma viande (boeuf ou poulet) directement du producteur dont je vois l’environnement qui est offert aux animaux et comment ils vivent en dehors, librement, bref, de bonnes conditions. Je suppose que ce qui cause un certain problème avec la fourrure c’est que c’est plus abstrait, on ne fait pas nécessairement le lien aussi facilement que ce cuir provient d’un animal… Bon, ce que je dis est un peu… décousu mais je crois que c’est une question sur laquelle il est assez difficile de se positionner. Je dois dire que je suis pour le fait d’acheter des pièces classiques, un style, quelque chose qu’on va léguer à nos enfants et ainsi de suite. Je rêve d’acheter un 2.55 ou quelque chose du genre. Je sais qu’il va durer, que ce n’est pas quelque chose qui va juste disparaître dans le néant de ma garde-robe dans trois mois.
    Je ne suis peut-être pas très claire mais ce que je veux dire c’est que ton post est très sage, surtout que tu ne veux pas faire la promotion. Je crois que juste le fait qu’on y pense, qu’on est conscientes de ce qui arrive et qu’on veut faire des choix éclairés fait qu’on considère plus ce phénomène.
    Tout ça pour dire, merci Garance pour ce beau post. <3

  • ANITA March, 18 2013, 11:15 / Reply

    Cette illustration est magnifique, dommage qu’elle ne soit pas dans ton eshop…

  • Lila March, 18 2013, 11:15 / Reply

    It is a very delicate issue, I myself am torn too… Animals are animals and every time I see real fur, I imagine my beloved dog’s eyes staring back at me… I was outraged when I knew that Beyonce had herself made a pair of trainers with various skins from different animals (even ostrich!!!) I respected her!!!! Now I don’t… Being wealthy does not give you the right to slaughter god’s creations for… a pair of trainers, c’mon!!
    Moreover, nowadays with so much advances in technology, fur can be perfectly replicated!!! For me, that solves the problem. But let’s get someting straight, nothing can replace a real leather shoes, handbag or whatever…. sadly (But if we think about killing an animal to have food, and using ALL the animal to make garments, that makes more sense.. right?, look at the primitive man!!).
    Big kiss G!

  • C2G2 March, 18 2013, 11:17 / Reply

    C’est parfait chère Garance :)

    Nous sommes toujours des chasseurs-cueilleurs dans l’âme, parcourant les plaines à la recherche de subsistance et de quoi nous mettre sur le râble dès les premiers frimas.
    Pas d’angélisme excessif, ni d’anthropomorphisme hasardeux.

    Vous exprimez clairement ce que je ressens aussi. Merci.

  • V. March, 18 2013, 11:18 / Reply

    Super post – avec toutes ces photos de fourrure (y compris dans des coiffes et des chaussures) j’en venais à ma demander où allait le monde… Une petite précision nécessaire je trouve : même si moi je suis aussi végétarienne je fais une nette distinction entre la fourrure, le cuir et la viande. En effet les modes de production ne sont pas les mêmes du tout et il suffit (mais il faut beaucoup de courage) de voir quelques vidéos de production de fourrure sur internet pour s’en rendre compte. Les bêtes destinées à la boucherie sont abattues tout d’abord avec un pistolet électrique. Même si il y a des ratés, elles sont sensées être inconscientes au moment de l’égorgement et de l’ouverture de leur corps. Le cuir est un sous-produit de cette industrie. Tandis que la fourrure se fait dans une autre chaîne de production. Elle est arrachée le plus vite possible du corps de la bête car elle ne doit pas être souillée. Beaucoup de vidéos montrent de ce fait des animaux encore vivants dont la peau est littéralement arrachée – et c’est également le cas lorsqu’il s’agit d’animaux “de ferme”, comme des lapins, car encore une fois il s’agit d’une chaîne de production spécifique.
    Il n’est donc pas tout à fait correct de comparer le végétarisme et “l’abstention de fourrure” comme on peut l’appeler.
    Sans compter que les élevages de fourrure sont aujourd’hui des élevages industriels dans lesquels des animaux, pour la plupart sauvages (renards par exemple) sont élevés en batterie dans des conditions difficilement compatibles avec l’esprit si doucement civilisé qui bruisse dans les rangs des défilés. J’ai des souvenirs visuels très désagréables de renards tapis de peur dans le fond de cages métallisées de toutes parts et dont la mort par électrocution par l’anus (désolée mais c’est comme ça) apparaît comme une délivrance. Je vous invite vraiment à regarder quelques-unes de ces vidéos, car la réalité y est très percutante.
    Bref, tout cela pour dire que l’industrie de la fourrure est tout à fait particulière. Si particulière que les Pays-Bas par exemple viennent de voter l’interdiction de la production de fourrure sur leur sol.
    Quoi qu’il en soit merci pour cette discussion. Et vive Stella, une belle femme dans tous les sens du terme.
    Une citation pour finir : On n’a pas deux coeurs, un pour les hommes, un pour les animaux. On a du coeur ou on n’en n’a pas (Lamartine).

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 11:18

    Merci infiniment pour ce documentaire V!

    Je suis végétarienne depuis longtemps mais je n’avais pas eu le courage “social” d’être végétalienne jusqu’ici. Merci vraiment du fond du coeur pour cette prise de conscience. C’est une conférence que j’essaierai de montrer dorénavant à tous ceux qui me demanderont pourquoi je suis végétalienne.

  • Carole March, 18 2013, 11:19 / Reply

    i eat meat occasionally i wear fur occasionally if i had to kill the animal i wear or eat….never would happen …certain chemicals in fabrics pollute the air water ocean earth…causing cancer….we could go on and on…for us it’s a want not a need… we live in of society of greed..do u think the friends that appear in your blog would give it up?

  • carole March, 18 2013, 11:19

    i watch a interview with Catherine Deneuve that ask her about the French attitude toward fur she replied in American u have capital punishment….

  • Carole March, 18 2013, 11:19

    I remember when white women gave up wearing fur it wasn’t correct….truth was it was out of style…other ethnic women pick up on fur they had the money and why shouldn’ t they….. this discussion could go on and on

  • Katie March, 18 2013, 11:21 / Reply

    I loooooove this post. It is so good to see someone as admired and influential as you questioning your impact, starting a dialogue, and encouraging others to question their impact too. Regardless of what anyone’s final decision is at the end of the day, being thoughtful about the products we consume and the impact they have is important. Also, I love how you weighed everyone’s comments with your own experiences to develop your own conclusion, and I genuinely admire the conclusion you came to. I don’t have a lot of products that I expect to have for life, mainly because I move too often and things always get left behind, and also because I can never really afford expensive quality pieces. But when I can afford it, and when I have the stability of one closet for a long time, I really want to break away from the disposable nature of dressing and buy investment pieces. Probably not fur, but you never know. An inherent part of questioning something includes being open to changing your mind later on down the road.

  • Anne-Charlotte March, 18 2013, 11:22 / Reply

    J’ai eu grand plaisir à lire ce poste inspiré dans lequel je me suis vraiment retrouvée.

  • matchingpoints March, 18 2013, 11:25 / Reply

    Merci pour votre article !
    Cette production en masse – les poulets comme le prêt-à- porter bon marché… – n’incite pas le consommateur à des achats réfléchis mais à une surconsommation. Vous parlez des femmes d’un certain âge qui gardaient leur manteau pendant des années, et maintenant ? Il faut toujours du nouveau au détriment de la qualité et du respect de la matière et de l’environnement. La viande, le cuir et la fourrure ont accompagné l’humanité, mais pas dans l’abandonne comme elle existe pour certains. Et de se tourner vers des produits synthétiques n’est peut-être pas la meilleure solution non plus…
    Nous avions fait un petit commentaire lors de votre premier article; le point de départ était que l’une de nous deux avait hérité d’un beau manteau de vison et on s’est posé un peu ce genre de question…
    En vieillissant, nous sommes de plus en plus tentées par la qualité – less is more, et ceci est valable dans tous les domaines !

  • matchingpoints March, 18 2013, 11:25

    …l’abondance bien sur…

  • vanessa March, 18 2013, 11:26 / Reply

    Super post Garance!! j’espère que ta voix sera écoutée!! c’est ça notre futur, la durabilité, la qualité et non la quantité… un pied-de-nez au capitalisme cependant.. dur dur de changer cela, mais comme tu le dis: il faut bien commencer par quelque part!
    xxx

  • Nathalie March, 18 2013, 11:27 / Reply

    This is why I keep coming to the blog. It is not all about how we look, it’s about how we represent ourselves in our lives.

    Thank you so much!

    Ps I love faux-fur, I think it makes people look as cuddly as a teddybear

  • L'Oliphant March, 18 2013, 11:32 / Reply

    I aprove this message!
    C’est bien dit en plus! ;)

  • Kiki March, 18 2013, 11:37 / Reply

    for someone in a position like yourself (“fashion blogger”) I imagine there must be times when your philosophical outlook treads a thin line between analyzing the “art & craft” of fashion/style versus being a voice that propels the industry of fashion onward = aiding the business side = selling clothes = constantly dictating a “new look”

  • Jie March, 18 2013, 11:37 / Reply

    Thank you Garance, I am glad to see that as someone at the forefront of fashion media, you can take such a restrained approach about consumerism, an attitude which i feel has inundated so many other blogs. With magazines screaming new MUST HAVE pieces every season, and blogs doing quite the same things; salivating over new (and expensive) collections, its tough not to feel swayed by the power of marketing. Leather, fur, meat-eating etc… Life should be about moderation for the benefit of our planet (and our pocketbooks).

  • Guro March, 18 2013, 11:38 / Reply

    Well done Garance! I love this article, and the fact that you recognise people’s right to their own opinion. I am not against fur, but I am getting more and more sceptical of the whole consumerism that seems to be growing to new heights. I agree with you that the fur industry is not THE problem, but it is certainly part of the problem. We buy too much, produce too much, and throw away waaaay to much. Norway, where I live, is not as bad as the US just yet, but I think we are heading the same way. Clothes and shoes – and food – is so cheap now compared to when I was growing up. It’s too easy to buy too much. So I try to think of the longer term – buying things that will last, resisting the temptation to buy things I don’t need, and to not buy (and cook) too much food. I also think the blogging industry is part of the problem now (though not your blog!), at least here in Norway, becasue so many blog posts are sponsored, affiliated and all about “today’s new buy”. That makes it very easy, especially for young people, to get carried away, and buy things they don’t need. I know, because I was on that spiral myself, using blogs as a way to find out what’s new in the shops. Fashion is, as you say, about style, not about the latest it-bag… And style is eternal, as we all know!

  • Michelle Gadd March, 18 2013, 11:40 / Reply

    That is a beautiful illustration! C’est magnifique!

  • The slow pace March, 18 2013, 11:45 / Reply

    I think I’m not strong enough to have a very radical opinion about anything. As you said (wisely) if I say no to fur completely, I should say no to leather, yummy gourmet burgers, lots of cosmetics (they are tested on animals too!) and other things that I can’t remember now, but I’m sure theer is more. I would be happy to be that strong-willed person, but I’m not.
    The same thing happens with trends… I have no personality and I love everything that is fashionable. But that I can control. Some time ago I decided to buy just things that I need and are timeless. I saved for my Burberry trench and I’m saving for my it bag (I still don’t know which one, but ‘m on it). So I’m quite happy about it, even though I feel a little bit nerd/looser sometimes when I’m the only one among my friends who doesn’t have that super fashionble sweatshirt/bag/shoe. Maybe I’m not the coolest girl and I can’t show in my blog that I have all the things that are trending now (Notice how I follow your Pardon my French episodes ;P ) but I can use that money for travelling or save it for my dream house in Venice.
    Oh, and just one more thing! I keep all the furs that belonged to my Grandmother and I hope one day I can have them tailored so I can wear them. Those furs were a present from my Gandfather and she used to wear them everyday to take me to school, pick me up from ballet classes or going to church. So they are part of my childhood memories too and I cherish them… I’m sorry but I just don’t think about the little animals who died to make such beautiful coats, I just think about my gorgeous nonna wearing them.

  • Juliette March, 18 2013, 11:48 / Reply

    C’est très bien dit, honnête et cohérent. Thumbs up Garance, comme d’habitude :)

  • YZA March, 18 2013, 11:50 / Reply

    Bravo pour ce billet et ta franchise – Je porte pas de fourrure et n’en porterai jamais ni du neuf ni du vintage (je partage ton avis sur la fourrure vintage – c’est un peu se camoufler derrière son petit doigt que de dire une fourrure vintage ce n’est pas pareil) – J- Tout comme toi je mange rarement de la viande et de la volaille et je privilégie la qualité et la provenance de ce que je mange- Par contre, je n’ai pas le raisonnement, que je respecte beaucoup d’ailleurs, de tout arrêter (viande + cuir + fourrure) – la production de chaussures de qualité en synthétique (comme Stella McCartney) n’est pas courante : il faudrait que l’on ait vraiment un panel de choix aussi large que pour le cuir mais c’est l’inverse pour la fourrure – si l’on ne peut pas se passer de chaussures, on peut choisir de ne pas porter de fourrure – les manteaux qui tiennent chaud ca existe – Et puis avoir un véritable cimetière sur le dos non merci – Ne vivant pas au moyen âge mais au XX1ème siècle dans un pays industrialisé, la fourrure est vraiment qq chose de futile et superflu pour moi qui en plus tue des animaux qui vivent dans des conditions atroces – Je ne me fais pas d’illusion ce ne sont pas mes idées qui feront fermer demain des élevages de fourrure mais je m’y tiens et peut être qu’un jour et il y a

  • Ashley R March, 18 2013, 11:55 / Reply

    Very thoughtful. I love the illustration as well!

  • Janis March, 18 2013, 11:55 / Reply

    I thought it was so interesting that the following post photo was of the sweet dog laying peacefully on a bed. If we allow ourselves to follow the conversation to it’s next level… what is the difference between wearing fur from a mink or wearing fur from a dog? Both animals feel pain, hunger, thirst and fear. It’s all a matter of perception and social acceptance.
    I do think the first step in changing attitudes is beginning a conversation. Thank you for doing that.

  • A. March, 18 2013, 12:09 / Reply

    Its a bit of evolution for me really. There is no absolute reason to wear fur apart from aesthetics etc…these are no longer the days where it is the most practical thing to have to wear an animals skin to stay warm.
    That being said I think the majority of us are waaaayy too judgemental of those who do wear fur. I experienced this first hand when in a classic case of my disorganization, I went to visit my in-laws without the sufficient warm clothes. So, my mother-in-law lent me her chic fur jacket for a week. I could swear i got more evil-eye glances than i had gotten in a lifetime.

    My position of leather on the other hand is different. While i am not one for leather clothing, I only purchase leather shoes. Why? because technology has not yet brought us something as wearable, breathable and pliable as genuine leather.

  • Noelia March, 18 2013, 12:12 / Reply

    The same happens here… it is just a couple of days that I was telling my colegues about that t-shirt that I got for Xmas as a present when I was 13 and that I still cherished when I was 18 and the t-shirt was almost transparent with so much washing during those years.

    A couple of months ago I decided that I was going to spend much more sensibly, which means buying less clothes, make better choices, stop and think about how much I am predictably going to wear this or that, will it last till next year, furthermore will I want to wear it next year… I am trying to dress according to my personality and what I find suits me rather than according to what is in fashion. I’ll wear trends but only if I find that they make me look good.

    And I don’t need to wear something new every weekend. I am interesting enough as a person, and attractive enough in myself. Beautiful, enhancing clothes, yes, but to express who I am, not to disguise it.

    I don’t need to expose lots of skin either. Men will be attracted to my eyes, my smile, and my tight jeans ok, but they will find me sexy (some will, some won’t ok) because I can be sexy no matter what, not because I am showing lots of cleavage. I hope I am explaining myself. Now I love myself enough so as not to need to present myself to others as if I were a piece of candy in a shop window. I’m not. I’m a person. A p-e-r-s-o-n.

    And I don’t like fur… I don’t find it beautiful unless for trims…

    Thank you Garance for your very interesting ideas and for bringing up the subject of moderate consumption.

    Love, love, love your blog

  • CL March, 18 2013, 12:13 / Reply

    I don’t wear fur, but I respect the choice of others. My mother has a lot of vintage fur from when it was in vogue, and I don’t think it’s a problem when you’re not killing new animals. It’s an ethics question that pretty much is up to the person.

    But, on the meat problem, I do have a definite opinion. I tried out being a “weekday vegetarian,” as Dr. Oz recommends and as the founder of Treehugger.com recommends and it honestly is fine. http://www.ted.com/talks/graham_hill_weekday_vegetarian.html
    It’s easier than being completely vegetarian because you can eat steak on the weekends and you consume less meat overall. It’s like Meatless Monday, but every weekday.

    One thing that makes it easier for me is Beyond Meat. It’s an animal-free chicken alternative. http://www.beyondmeat.com/ I know that it’s hard to try fake meat, but it’s antibiotic, GMO, and gluten free. It’s also completely vegan.

    Mark Bittman, the New York Times food critic, said on Beyond Meat: “When you take Brown’s product, cut it up and combine it with, say, chopped tomato and lettuce and mayonnaise with some seasoning in it, and wrap it in a burrito, you won’t know the difference between that and chicken. I didn’t, at least, and this is the kind of thing I do for a living.” His whole review is here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/11/opinion/sunday/finally-fake-chicken-worth-eating.html?_r=0

  • Marie-France March, 18 2013, 12:18 / Reply

    Merci Garance de nous faire partager ta vision. Déja, je ne sais pas si tu connais le terme mais tu es ce qu’on appelle une fléxitarienne, quelqu’un qui est souvent végétarienne (90 %), et qui consomme de la viande (bio / bonne qualité) de temps en temps.
    Et je crois qu’on peut aimer la mode, suivre les tendances avec passion et adhérer au mouvement du slow wear : Acheter moins, acheter mieux. acheter durable !
    Tiens d’ailleurs c’est drôle, j’avais utilisé ton illustration “gréve de la mode” pour un article a ce sujet…
    http://www.savethegreen.fr/2012/12/13/adoptez-la-philosophie-du-slow-wear/

  • Nadia March, 18 2013, 12:18 / Reply

    C’est dit avec une telle simplicité sans fioriture et hypocrisie, ton article est franc et va tout bonnement droit au but merci de nous faire partager chaque jour tes pensées tes avis vis à vis de la mode ta vision des choses sont très réalistes. Bises Garance et reste comme tu es.

  • Nathalie, L'heure d'été March, 18 2013, 12:22 / Reply

    J’aime beaucoup la façon dont tu abordes le sujet, dont tu soulèves simplement et calmement les questions. Je pense que je te rejoins. (De toute façon, je n’ai jamais été manteau en fourrure, sans pour autant fustiger mes voisins.)
    Et oui…on évolue au fil du temps. Pas facile d’avoir toujours une attitude en adéquation totale avec nos pensées. Je dois avouer que, pour l’instant, je ne refuse pas le poulet dans l’avion, encore que, après ton post et le visionnage de certains reportages… j’y réfléchis.
    Quant à Stella, magnifique créatrice, elle va effectivement au bout de ce qu’elle prône. Si je ne suis pas aussi radicale qu’elle, je dois avouer que j’aime ce qu’elle propose.

  • Mary, We Heart Vintage March, 18 2013, 12:23 / Reply

    What a beautifully written and thoughtful piece of writing. Fur is a difficult and inflammatory subject but you’ve tackled it in a great way. Personally I wouldn’t choose to wear fur, but I am 100 % behind your idea of being more aware of what we’re consuming and what we as consumers endorse through our buying choices. Have a a great day!

  • Susana March, 18 2013, 12:26 / Reply

    I grew up with similar experiences to yours…as a little girl visiting my grandmother in Europe, I refused to eat the bunnies I played with (even though that was the leanest and only meat my grandfather could eat) and to this day, I don’t eat rabbit….but I eat other meats, and when I eat the little a eat, I actually love it. Nevertheless, for some people, the killing of animals is just not easy. My grandmother, for example, had to ask her neighbor to kill the bunnies or the chickens that she needed. She would pluck the feathers or skin them, but not kill them…she just couldn’t, even though she lived on a farm and needed them to eat.

    Now, fast-forward to me. I own some vintage furs and some modern fur articles. As long as I know they come from reputable furriers that farm these animals humanely, I’m okay with it. With that said, I REALLY love two parts from your reflection:

    The first is: “It’s too bad, because there’s a real joy in moderation.” I simply LOVE this because it’s absolutely true. I would add that it is precisely moderation what truly forces us to be innovative with what we have in our closets instead of buying always the “latest” and ending up dressed like everyone else. For all the “independent” we want/claim to be, we often end up being quite the following sheep…

    The second is your distinction between fashion and STYLE. Yes! I loved how you put it…I feel exactly the same way…style rarely is the latest, which is also the result of the moderation you mentioned earlier.

    Wonderful discussion, Garance. Thank you for giving us this opportunity :)

    xo,
    Susana
    http://www.akeytothearmoire.com

  • meet me on the sunny road March, 18 2013, 12:29 / Reply

    I SO love this post! Considerate and respectful, just perfect. I come to admire you more and more Garance, you are such a good example.

    Apart from the buttkissing, I have to say that I completely agree (oh wait, more buttkissing?). I’m not against meat or leather or fur, but moderation is key, just as with everything else in life. I do however think there is a difference between vintage fur and new fur. Ofcourse if you’re really against fur, it’s all the same. But giving a good fur coat a second life, and making it last as long as possible is part of having respect and being grateful for what you have. If we go to the point where we kill an animal for a coat, the very least we can do is wear it till it’s completely worn out. And because a good fur can be worn for many years, that can involve the fur becoming second-hand or vintage. It’s also part of buying less isn’t it? Making the most of what you already have, or making the most of what someone else has and doesn’t want anymore. That way, to me, a vintage fur is always better then a new fur. Don’t buy a new one when somewhere in the world, a fabulous vintage fur is still waiting to be worn some more. (And hat doesn’t just go for fur, in my opinion)

  • Sasha March, 18 2013, 12:36 / Reply

    Dear Garance, since you’ve mentioned that “on te pose des questions” I have one.

    You decide to evaluate , become more responsible human being and start making choices with consciousness to leave in a more balanced friendly present/future. Moderation and style. Feels good.

    Chiken been killed and prepared specially for you. You refuse it, thinking about its provenance. Chiken goes to waste. Is killed for nothing.

    You ready to make it a step further in commitment for conscious living?

    Is really thought and demands hell of a courage to leave that way, with totall awareness.

  • Gigi March, 18 2013, 12:42 / Reply

    Wow tes illustrations sont vraiment toooop Garance! Pointues et raffinées!

    A vrai dire, je n’ai pas d’avis sur la fourrure, le sujet ne m’inspire pas du tout (d’ailleurs je n’avais pas commenté le post où tu traitais du sujet).D’autres sujets dans d’autres domaines me font me poser des questions… En revanche, ton post est vraiment agréable à lire et vraiment intéressant.

    xx G.

  • Amee March, 18 2013, 12:50 / Reply

    Very well written post Garance! I love how you looked at many perspectives about this controversial issue.

  • Virginie/Mode9 March, 18 2013, 12:50 / Reply

    Je suis tout à fait d’accord avec toi, il faut de la modération en toute chose ! Le problème c’est surtout que nous sommes trop nombreux sur cette planète et qu’il va falloir sérieusement à penser à la décroissance mais difficile quand une grande partie du monde n’a pas encore eu sa part de consommation ! Vaste, vaste sujet…
    http://www.mode9.fr

  • Rachel March, 18 2013, 1:06 / Reply

    I understand wanting to look stylish and admiring what other people are wearing. I just don’t believe it is a meaningful reason to support an industry that can be unspeakably cruel to animals. Is fashion and staying current really more important than standing up for those that can’t speak for themselves?

  • Some Cozy Night March, 18 2013, 1:13 / Reply

    Thank you for this thoughtful and honest post. I have been struggling with the line myself, but had always stopped at fur. Yet, I wear leather (if Stella would only make a size five that is *actually* small enough!), eat meat (didn’t for a long time, then started again, if I know where it comes from…and I, too, am “Pasta, please” in-flight) and wear cosmetics that I like, not taking too much time to think about testing, etc., etc. Sometimes I think about cleaning up my whole act, but I think that is being a little hard on myself and also a little against how the world is set up. I guess the best thing to push for is, as you suggest, being respectful not only of other people’s opinions, but also of the animals themselves.

  • Echidna March, 18 2013, 1:18 / Reply

    I totally get your point Garance. I have to admit it I love all animal hide. Lanvin water snake hightop LOVE. I would totally wear fur if I’m a woman in a cold country. I promise I will cherish my crocodile wallet and pass it on to my niece one day. It will never be a waste.

  • Kat March, 18 2013, 1:23 / Reply

    Excellent post once again Garance. Beautifully articulating pretty much my whole struggle with “ethical” fashion and food. It’s animal welfare vs. people welfare vs. planet welfare… and everyone has an (often uninformed) opinion.
    The whole “style over fashion” thing is why your blog is my favourite on the internet. Oddly enough, closely followed by your Scott’s.

  • 40 and so what March, 18 2013, 1:24 / Reply

    Alors là, c’est de l’analyse et du post qui en dit long ! Bravo !

  • Lou March, 18 2013, 1:25 / Reply

    Je ne mange pas de viande, mais je ne trouve pas ça mal d’en manger. Je pense que ça doit être la surabondance qui me dégoute. En revanche je porte du cuir mais je le garde longtemps, je préfère garder mon sac en cuir quatre ans plutot que d’acheter un sac en pétrole (similicuir) tous les trois mois car les hanses se cassent. Mais ce n’est pas la seule raison, le cuir c’est beau et ça me plait. Par contre je trouve ça tellement plus grave d’acheter des vêtements fait par des hommes surexploités que de porter de la fourrure. J’ai 17 ans mais je n’achète que des vêtements fabriqués dans des pays où il y a des droits du travail. Même si bien sur la cause des animaux est importante, je pense qu’à trop plaindre les animaux on oublie parfois les conditions de vies misérables qu’ont une partie des hommes.

  • Agathe March, 18 2013, 1:27 / Reply

    C’est à ce moment là que j’adore le blog. Voilà une réflexion construite, pleine de bon sens et parfaitement conclue. C’est à ce moment là que vous méritez votre célébrité Garance, merci à vous !

  • Gigi March, 18 2013, 1:27

    Je suis d’accord avec vous.

  • Teresa March, 18 2013, 1:27 / Reply

    Totally agreed!!!

  • Mary March, 18 2013, 1:28 / Reply

    Le cuir est sensuel et coupe du vent; la fourrure tient bien plus chaud que les doublures synthétiques.
    Depuis quelques années, je n’achète plus que des chaussures en cuirs et si doublées, en cuir également. Cela coûte cher (très cher) mais je ne transpire plus des pieds et ayant des gros problèmes de circulation, en hiver mes pieds restent plus chauds beaucoup plus longtemps. Je respecte mes vêtements en cuir et la doublure en fourrure de mon nouveau manteau et je ferai tout pour les garder beaux longtemps car ils me rendent la vie plus confortable.

  • Elo March, 18 2013, 1:34 / Reply

    Très belle plume Garance. Un post écrit sans gravité sur un sujet aussi controversé.
    Des arguments posés et réfléchis sans tomber dans l’hypocrisie.

    http://suelleninmontreal.blogspot.ca

  • Zsuzsanna March, 18 2013, 1:40 / Reply

    Thank you, Garance, for this beautiful words. There are several aspects on this honest and interesting post, that has to be emphasized all the time: we have to learn to have more respect for what we consume, otherwise everything will become worthless or boring eventually. Beside this, I’m so grateful, because you stand up for the timeless style, that has (almost) nothing to do with “all new, all the time”. It’s kind of brave, and definitely lovely from you :) So, I hope we’ll all be beautiful and we’ll have a lot of questions to ask!:)

  • abigail March, 18 2013, 1:56 / Reply

    this is such a beautifully written and deeply considered piece. i wish that more people and even designers would come to the same realization that you’ve come to in that we don’t need all new all the time. why mass produce new fur when there is so much vintage fur at our disposal?

    abigail
    http://www.farandwildjewelry.com

  • Vintage hype March, 18 2013, 1:59 / Reply

    Je comprends tout à fait ce que tu expliques. Tuer un animal qui a vécu à l’air libre plusieurs années, et qui a été traité correctement, nourri correctement,… ça ne me choque pas non plus. Mais la viande industrielle ça me choque un peu plus… Quant à la fourrure… je ne suis pas contre. J’ai souvent été sermonnée par des personnes qui faisait du “délit de faciès”, car ils acceptaient qu’une vache moyennement belle soit tuée pour leur sac, mais pas un petit lapin tout mignon pour les pompons de mon écharpe (c’est très rare que je craque sur de la fourrure dans mes prix, c’est le seul article en fourrure que j’ai). Or, pour moi, il n’y a pas de différence entre tuer une vache et tuer un lapin…

    Je n’ai rien contre les personnes qui sont contre la fourrure… en revanche je déteste lorsqu’une personne anti-fourrure-animal-mignon-mais-ok-pour-le-cuir-et-les-poulets-élévés-à-20000000-du-mètre-carré me fait la moral. Et c’est l’une des raisons pour lesquelles j’aime cet article: tu nous donnes ton avis, sans pour autant juger celles (et ceux, il y a forcément des mecs ici) qui ne pensent pas comme toi. Et bravo aussi parce que c’est un sujet difficile… d’autant plus que ton avis est un peu à contre-courant de ce que je lis d’habitude dans les magazines !

  • Susan March, 18 2013, 1:59 / Reply

    We can always count on you to keep it real, Garance. I love having these discussions. I have been a vegetarian for 20 years, but I also own leather shoes and purses (which have lasted a lifetime). Lately I’ve been struggling in my quest for beauty/fashion/health and trying to remain conscientious about what I’m doing to myself & my body, animals, the planet, etc. all at the same time! It gets dizzying. So–this is a timely discussion, in my opinion, and we need to keep having more of them (can we do toxins in makeup & beauty products next?!)!

  • lisa March, 18 2013, 2:03 / Reply

    I don’t think there is any ethically produced fur… We have a lot of fur farming in Finland, and although we generally have high standards for a lot of things, and very aware consumers, just the fact that you keep foxes in small cages (or chickens or whatever), to me means these animals can’t be too happy. I’m a vegetarian, but I don’t really have a problem with killing animals (I eat and have killed fish), but I want whatever I kill to at least have lived a nice life before.

    I love fur, It’s beautiful and soft and warm and wonderful, but we can’t always have everything just because it’s pretty. I prefer to get a cat and admire her fur and cuddle with her. :)

    and although vintage is better I think it upholds an esthetic that I don’t condone.

  • Mandy @ lady and pups March, 18 2013, 2:04 / Reply

    The only logical conclusion I can apply to myself is that I only wear what I eat as well. Beef – leather. Lamb – lamb skin. Rabbits – rabbit fur. Fox? Nope. Mink? Definitely not. Consuming an animal in its entirely and making use of everything it gave up its life for, is in my opinion sustainable, respectful and logical.

  • timina March, 18 2013, 2:10 / Reply

    Yes yes yes! I totally agree! I love your blog, and that of Scott, too!

  • Ellen March, 18 2013, 2:15 / Reply

    fantastic and intelligent response to a very controversial topic. bravo for encouraging the fashion world to start thinking about sustainability and where our clothing comes from.

  • Caroline March, 18 2013, 2:16 / Reply

    Thank you for the comment on consumerism… Here’s a good video to complete the discussion :
    http://www.storyofstuff.org/movies-all/story-of-stuff/

  • Anna March, 18 2013, 2:17 / Reply

    yes I have noticed you wearing the same clothes on ‘Pardon my French’ a number of times.I admire it.I think it’s very strange when people list shopping as a hobby.I mean going to shops and buying things is a hobby? how boring are you? It is sad that a whole generation is being raised to consume and never be satiated.

  • Felicia March, 18 2013, 2:24 / Reply

    Thank you so much, Garance, for your thoughtful commentary. I grew up in a really cold place (Norway) that has a tradition for fur, but I have ambivalent feelings about it, much like you. Knowing a bit about how even the modern, and “humane” fur industry works, I find it hard to justify wearing fur simply because it is pretty and to consume fur as a normal fashion. I grew up with mink and fox farms around and it isn’t a pretty business.

    There is always the option of making high fashion of fur from animals that we can raise humanely for food – shearling and rabbit fur comes to mind.

    Thank you also for thinking about the overall message of new-new-new. It is a hard balance to strike, being stylish and fashionable, and thinking about the footprint our obsession leave behind at the same time.

    Love your blog:)

  • soniachocolat March, 18 2013, 2:27 / Reply

    Je ne suis jamais déçue par ce que tu peux dire. Merci pour ton honnêteté et merci de me faire réfléchir. Le style a

  • Patricia March, 18 2013, 2:40 / Reply

    That’s why I love your blog!

    Your grounded. You are sincere. You are profound. Apart the ozher qualities you have and I like, too.

    Keep on like that.

    Besos from Santa Cruz in Bolivia

    Patricia

    http://www.patricisyclea.com

  • EVa March, 18 2013, 2:43 / Reply

    A beautiful and great article! I will never buy fur and I’m also working on a more timeless wardrobe. The leather thing has always been an issue for me too. In the grocery store there is every information you want about where the animal came from and what kind of life they have had. But what about our leather boots or bags, how did those animal live? Would love it when brands and designers could tell us a little bit more about that too, or would they be scared about the consequences? I don’t know, but I still think it’s a good idea. When we have the right to live happily animals have too. xx

    http://www.creativityandchocolate.com

  • kris March, 18 2013, 2:44 / Reply

    very well written….xoxo

  • sylva March, 18 2013, 2:45 / Reply

    Bravo! Bravo! et rebravo! Ce texte bien tourné résume ma pensée; qualité VS quantité. Moment précieux, intemporalité. Cultiver l’esprit et le goût. Donner une valeur réelle et humaine aux choses. Le style qui reste! Merci.

  • Ambyr March, 18 2013, 2:48 / Reply

    I love how this all came together. I think in the end it’s about awareness, ethics and appreciation. Everything in life can have a negative side but it doesn’t have to at the same time.

    xoxo
    http://www.thewrittenrunway.com

  • jicky March, 18 2013, 2:48 / Reply

    j’adore le dessin (et ton texte, riche et nuancé)

  • Milena March, 18 2013, 2:52 / Reply

    Oh mon dieu. Merci Garance, ça doit être un des premiers commentaires que je poste sur ce blog alors que je te suis depuis des années (au moins 3, si si), et c’est peut-être pas très sympa écrit noir sur blanc, mais c’est sympa de sortir du shallow pour une fois! Quand j’ai vu l’article je me suis dit “nooon, mais on en est encore à discuter du pour/contre fur”, mais en fait, je trouve ta réflexion profonde et intéressante, merci de nous la faire partager! Vu que je suis aussi en pleine réflexion quand à mon mode de vie/consommation, je ne peux qu’approuver si ton blog prend un peu plus cette tournure!

  • Ingrid March, 18 2013, 2:59 / Reply

    Garance merci!,

    Cet article est surement un des meilleurs que j’ai lu sur ce site (notamment avec celui sur les régimes dans les magazines, les cures spéciales à base de légumes ou de fruits…)
    Je t’avoue que je désertais un peu ton blog (pas beaucoup de temps et beaucoup de photo qui ne me parlait pas vraiment pour être franche avec toi).

    Mais cet article me fait largement réfléchir, je pense qu’il reflète largement la mentalité actuelle et cette hypocrisie ambiante sur le sujet.
    Cela fait du bien de lire une personne du milieu de la mode tel que toi parle aussi librement et sincèrement sur le sujet (comme tu le fais toujours d’où ton succès ;)) sans pour autant donner une leçon de vie.

    Donc MERCI Garance pour cet article.

  • ines March, 18 2013, 3:00 / Reply

    love love love ;) merci

  • Virginie March, 18 2013, 3:13 / Reply

    Bonjour Garance,
    Je partage ton opinion et ma position est je crois équivalente à la tienne.
    J’ai deux pièces en fourrures vintage. Vintage non pas pour me sentir moins coupable mais pour la valeur qu’elles ont représentée et qu’elles représentent pour moi.
    Un peu comme les vieilles dames.
    Et puis sinon il faut aller jusqu’au bout effectivement. Pas de viande, pas de cuir et pourquoi pas non plus pas de maquillage ni de médicaments puisque testés sur les animaux.
    Et je suis d’accord avec Mr J le synthétique avec le pétrole…
    Il faut respecter et ne pas acheter à tord et à travers.
    Deux excellents bouquins que je recommande à ce sujet:
    L’art de l’essentiel et l’art de la simplicité de Dominique Loreau
    Bonne journée à toutes et à tous

  • Jessica March, 18 2013, 3:13 / Reply

    Great opinion piece, very balanced and honest like always.

    Just wanted to mention an example to reinforce your point on not being for the “all new, all the time” concept. Emmanuelle Alt, whose style we all love is not only consistent with it but she wears some items of clothing repeatedly. There are countless of pictures on the internet where she is wearing the same piece in different ensembles. Right now comes to mind a Balmain Homme belt she usually has on. And this is someone that has access to any clothing she could desire, but she chooses to wears some pieces over and over, season after season.

    Thanks,
    Jessica

  • c1ara March, 18 2013, 3:22 / Reply

    oui je suis d’accord avec toi, si on adopte une position éthique définie sur un sujet, pour moi la logique est de la tenir sur toute la ligne.
    D’aucuns diront que manger est une nécessité alors que porter une fourrure n’est pas indispensable oui mais s’il est indispensable de se nourrir, est-il vraiment indispensable de manger de la viande pour ce faire?? Non et on le voit bien avc les végétariens par ex. (pour moi la différence c’est peut-être qu’on peux choisir de ne pas manger de viande simplement pour SA santé alors que la fourrure c’est à chaque fois basé sur des principes éthiques)
    Donc dans la mesure où il n’est pas question d’indispensable ou pas indispensable et qu’il n’y a pas d’échelle de valeur entre les principes, je te rejoins sur le fait que si on est vraiment contre la fourrure alors j’ai du mal à comprendre qu’on ne soit pas végétarien…
    mais ça c’est dans l’IDEAL, quand on arrive à accorder nos opinions et nos actes et ce n’est pas toujours facile je trouve … question de volonté, d’envie, de rigueur, de possibilité etc.. tellement de facteur entrent dans l’équation que cette conduite idéale de respect de nos principes reste qd même marginale par rapport à la masse totale des consommateurs
    dc pour moi le plus “honnête” (avec soi même) est de faire son possible, être conscient que dans l’absolu il ‘faudrait’ allier le respect de cette conduite ds ts les domaines pour être cohérents mais se dire que notre choix de ne pas porter de fourrure ou vis versa de ne pas manger de viandes est déjà un geste, même petit et partiel. Dans le même sens une femme qui avant achetait régulièrement de la fourrure et qui déciderait de réduire sa consommation de fourrure, c’est quand même un geste même s’il n’est pas jusqu’au-boutiste
    En découle le fait le plus important c’est à dire le respect de ce que fait l’autre: un premier aura choisi de se positionner par rapport au port de la fourrure et même s’il mange de la viande, le fait de ne pas ‘consommer’ de la fourrure aura déjà compté et vice versa pour celui qui ne mange pas de viande et porte de la fourrure (même si cette combinaison me semble plus rare car il faut plus de volonté pour arrêter qqchose(manger de la viande) que pour ne pas commencer qqchose(acheter de la fourrure ))
    donc le respect du choix de l’autre est pour moi la base car ce qui compte AU FINAL ce n’est pas si telle ou telle personne est cohérente sur toute la ligne (ça c’est juste une question perso, du point de vue individuel) mais le TOTAL de consommateur de viande et le total d’achat de fourrure, c’est ce que les producteurs prennent en compte!
    donc dans l’absolu le mieux est d’être cohérent (c’est de la logique au point de vue individuel) mais un petit pas compte quand même au final sur le total donc ne pas respecter ce que fait l’autre vraiment je ne comprends pas!!!

    moi ce qui me révolte ce n’est pas tant la fourrure ou le fait de manger de la viande mais les tests sur les animaux, je trouve ça non éthique au plus haut point !!!!! mais après je comprends que tous n’ont pas les moyens car c’est une chose de NE PAS acheter mais c’est quand même autre chose d’acheter plus cher !

    enfin voilà mon avis ;) je ne sais pas si je me fais bien comprendre, c’est vrai que cette question est épineuse ds le sens où on peut vite être tenté de se positionner à l’extrême..

  • Morag March, 18 2013, 3:24 / Reply

    Thank you for your thoughtful article. The proliferation of fur on the catwalk concerns me deeply because the fur is not a byproduct of the meat industry but simply an unnecessary luxury. This, to me, makes it ugly and vulgar; a hangover of a less enlightened age, like racism and homophobia. I adore fashion but could never buy fur unless I knew the animals had been humanely raised and slaughtered.

  • celine March, 18 2013, 3:25 / Reply

    tres bel article! merci pour ton avis garance!

  • Caticat March, 18 2013, 3:30 / Reply

    Aujourd’hui, notre société de consommation a perdue en lisibilité, traçabilité (origine des produits, transformation, circuit etc..) mondialisation, globalisation… comme tu le conçois, il faut privilégier la qualité, si on peut se le permettre financièrement.
    Je fais depuis 2009 une overdose des doudounes à capuches ajourées de fourrure (je ne porte pas de fourrure, je suis contre), mais on est en 2013 et ça n’arrête pas… l’autre fois dans le métro, une dizaine de jeunes filles portaient plus ou moins la même doudoune avec la même fourrure autour de la capuche, alors à cette échelle, combien d’animaux, lesquels et dans quelles conditions ont été tués pour satisfaire cette rencontre de consommateurs?
    surtout qu’en Europe de l’Est, j’ai entendu parlé de circuits douteux (chien, chats…)
    de toute manière, je suis sûre que ces doudounes et autre manteaux ajourés de fourrure vont se démoder très vite…je ne peux déjà plus les voir en pâture :) vivement les beaux jours, vivement le printemps ^^
    bisettes

  • c1ara March, 18 2013, 3:34 / Reply

    je ne sais pas trop si mon commentaire est passé, mauvais bouton.. donc je le renvoie!

    oui je suis d’accord avec toi, si on adopte une position éthique définie sur un sujet, pour moi la logique est de la tenir sur toute la ligne.
    D’aucuns diront que manger est une nécessité alors que porter une fourrure n’est pas indispensable oui mais s’il est indispensable de se nourrir, est-il vraiment indispensable de manger de la viande pour ce faire?? Non et on le voit bien avc les végétariens par ex. (pour moi la différence c’est peut-être qu’on peux choisir de ne pas manger de viande simplement pour SA santé alors que la fourrure c’est à chaque fois basé sur des principes éthiques)
    Donc dans la mesure où il n’est pas question d’indispensable ou pas indispensable et qu’il n’y a pas d’échelle de valeur entre les principes, je te rejoins sur le fait que si on est vraiment contre la fourrure alors j’ai du mal à comprendre qu’on ne soit pas végétarien…
    mais ça c’est dans l’IDEAL, quand on arrive à accorder nos opinions et nos actes et ce n’est pas toujours facile je trouve … question de volonté, d’envie, de rigueur, de possibilité etc.. tellement de facteur entrent dans l’équation que cette conduite idéale de respect de nos principes reste qd même marginale par rapport à la masse totale des consommateurs
    dc pour moi le plus “honnête” (avec soi même) est de faire son possible, être conscient que dans l’absolu il ‘faudrait’ allier le respect de cette conduite ds ts les domaines pour être cohérents mais se dire que notre choix de ne pas porter de fourrure ou vis versa de ne pas manger de viandes est déjà un geste, même petit et partiel. Dans le même sens une femme qui avant achetait régulièrement de la fourrure et qui déciderait de réduire sa consommation de fourrure, c’est quand même un geste même s’il n’est pas jusqu’au-boutiste
    En découle le fait le plus important c’est à dire le respect de ce que fait l’autre: un premier aura choisi de se positionner par rapport au port de la fourrure et même s’il mange de la viande, le fait de ne pas ‘consommer’ de la fourrure aura déjà compté et vice versa pour celui qui ne mange pas de viande et porte de la fourrure (même si cette combinaison me semble plus rare car il faut plus de volonté pour arrêter qqchose(manger de la viande) que pour ne pas commencer qqchose(acheter de la fourrure ))
    donc le respect du choix de l’autre est pour moi la base car ce qui compte AU FINAL ce n’est pas si telle ou telle personne est cohérente sur toute la ligne (ça c’est juste une question perso, du point de vue individuel) mais le TOTAL de consommateur de viande et le total d’achat de fourrure, c’est ce que les producteurs prennent en compte!
    donc dans l’absolu le mieux est d’être cohérent (c’est de la logique au point de vue individuel) mais un petit pas compte quand même au final sur le total donc ne pas respecter ce que fait l’autre vraiment je ne comprends pas!!!

    moi ce qui me révolte ce n’est pas tant la fourrure ou le fait de manger de la viande mais les tests sur les animaux, je trouve ça non éthique au plus haut point !!!!! mais après je comprends que tous n’ont pas les moyens car c’est une chose de NE PAS acheter mais c’est quand même autre chose d’acheter plus cher !

    enfin voilà mon avis ;) je ne sais pas si je me fais bien comprendre, c’est vrai que cette question est épineuse ds le sens où on peut vite être tenté de se positionner à l’extrême..

  • Corinne March, 18 2013, 3:41 / Reply

    Merci pour le partage de cette jolie réflexion, la fourrure ne m.a jamais attirée mais je ne pousse pas non plus la logique eco responsable au cuir et à Zara . Et Oui !!! le Style c’est ça qui est intéressant tu as tellement raison.

  • Juliane March, 18 2013, 3:54 / Reply

    Dear Garance,
    I have always enjoyed reading your blog, as it is very unique among those many fashion blogs. I love how personal it is and how open you are about your opinions and choices. Maybe due to the extremely personal touch, it has always pained me to see so little reflection from you on some of the most urging sustainability topics related to fashion.
    I am more than happy to see this has been changing for some time now – it makes me enjoy reading your blog even more! While I may not always fully agree with your conclusion, I can tell that you have truly thought about these issues and tried to find an answer for yourself. I love to see this, and I love to see someone doing it who has as much influence as you.
    Thank you! Please keep on writing such thoughtful, well-reflected posts on these critical topics!

  • Noemi March, 18 2013, 4:11 / Reply

    I hope you will never be ready to buy a fur, honestly.
    And trust me, I’m vegetarian, there’s a difference between leather shoes and furs!

    http://www.webelieveinstyle.net

  • tripstreasures March, 18 2013, 4:13 / Reply

    i love the “nuance” in your story
    it’s definitely better to be unsure or constantly questioning than to be hyprocrite

    i look forward to reading more about sustainable fashion or even better ” style”

    http://www.tripsandtreasures.net

  • camille March, 18 2013, 4:13 / Reply

    Bravo !

  • MAGDA March, 18 2013, 4:19 / Reply

    but you wore fur or fake fur, I mean, I see this photo
    http://fashionista.com/2012/05/are-scott-schuman-and-garance-dore-over-street-style/ and
    y wear fake fur, but some people told me it could be (sometimes) more contaminated than natural fur, and I am a bit confused, sometimes I feel guilty and I think we need more information, we need to evolve …

  • Gabrielle March, 18 2013, 4:25 / Reply

    Un beau post pour une prise de conscience nécessaire.

    Je suis végétarienne mais porter du cuir ne me dérange pas dans la mesure où davantage d’animaux sont tués pour leur viande que pour leur cuir. Donc effectivement, autant utiliser l’animal en entier.
    Mais pour obtenir la fourrure, le problème concerne le piégeage et l’écorchement puis le dépeçage des animaux encore vivants. En Chine, certains animaux survivent 10 minutes après avoir été entièrement dépecés.
    Tuer un animal sans lui faire mal pour s’en nourrir et s’en vêtir quand c’est nécessaire, c’est incomparable avec le fait de le dépecer vivant. Est-ce que tu peux imaginer, avec toute l’honnêteté dont tu te montres capable, être dépecée vivante?

    Rien ne peut justifier une telle torture.

  • Ginger March, 18 2013, 4:28 / Reply

    I covered this issue a few months ago… Balancing the love of fur with the love of furry things is something I struggle with. I AM a vegetarian, and while it wasn’t an ethical choice, I can see the ethical value to refraining from eating meat. With prices for fur always dropping, I can only imagine what poor conditions these animals are kept in while they are alive. My solution is to buy vintage fur or have pieces constructed for me from pre-owned fur. I live in NYC and I have a fabulous (very reasonably priced) gentleman who makes my furs. You can find his contact information as well as my post about FUR and ethics at the link below… Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

    http://ginger-snap.com/fur-love-and-the-love-of-furry-things/

    Ginger

  • Mina1202 March, 18 2013, 4:35 / Reply

    Bonjour Garance,
    Le poulet dans l’avion est une excellente illustration. Dans la même veine, il y a les gilets en lapin qui ont fait fureur il y a deux ans dans les rues de Paris. 90% d’entre eux étaient made in China, écoulés par centaines avec ou sans marque. Cela fait tellement de fourrures de lapin, dans quelles conditions ont elles été obtenues ?
    (avons nous porté du chat sans le savoir ? Après avoir mangé du cheval à mon insu, cela ne m’étonnerait plus !)

  • V. March, 18 2013, 4:41 / Reply

    En lisant les commentaires je suis très très surprise par le nombre de remarques qui mettent sur un même pied le fait de manger de la viande ou de porter du cuir et celui de porter de la fourrure. Ton joli post va d’ailleurs un peu dans ce sens. Or il y a une différence fondamentale entre les deux premières pratiques et la dernière (et promis juré je suis végétarienne donc je ne cherche pas à justifier une attitude personnelle qui serait contradictoire) : les conditions de production de la fourrure relèvent des pratiques cruelles ( = animaux la plupart du temps sauvages élevés en batterie, peaux arrachées régulièrement à des animaux encore vivants et non étourdis) tandis que l’abattage des animaux pour la boucherie est précédé d’un étourdissement des animaux au pistolet. Sauf cas de déviance et de cruauté de la part des employés d’abattoirs, l’abattage des animaux ne s’inscrit donc pas dans le cadre des pratiques cruelles. Si cruauté il y a elle n’est pas intrinsèque et institutionnalisée. Et pour autant que l’on fasse attention à sa viande, en mangeant par exemple de la viande bio, on peut relativement facilement s’assurer que les animaux ont eu une vie, sinon heureuse, du moins une vie. Et le cuir est un sous-produit de cette dernière industrie.
    Je me demande donc, en lisant tous ces commentaires, si il n’y a pas une volonté (peut-être même inconsciente) de mettre dans le même panier d’une part des pratiques cruelles (arracher des fourrures à des animaux vivants) et d’autre part d’abattage “non cruel” (étourdir des animaux avant de les saigner pour manger leur viande – pratique pouvant être qualifiée de non cruelle lorsque réalisée correctement) afin de mieux se justifier de ne rien faire du tout et de ne rien changer ( = de toute façon c’est trop dur de tout changer donc comme je mange de la viande et que je porte du cuir je porte aussi de la fourrure). On ne peut pas comparer le fait de tuer un animal au fait d’exercer de la cruauté sur celui-ci. Autre exemple : on ne peut pas comparer le gavage des oies (pratique reconnue cruelle et interdite dans plusieurs pays européens comme l’Allemagne, la Norvège…) à l’abattage du cheptel domestique (pratique non reconnue cruelle et interdite nulle part). Si le droit fait cette distinction fondamentale il me semble qu’il est utile et fondamental de l’incorporer au débat.
    Après cette précision (capitale !!!!), le temps des remerciements : merci pour ce post. Il me rassure un peu après la dernière page du Vogue de février et ses escarpins en vison. Et il panse un tout petit peu ma plaie : la tendresse que j’avais perdue pour le monde de la mode, qui m’émerveille pourtant depuis que je suis toute petite, mais qui ces temps-ci m’attriste plutôt du fait de cette débauche de fourrure, et provoque en moi un indicible malaise. Merci pour cela.

  • MGF March, 18 2013, 4:42 / Reply

    MERCI MERCI MERCI

  • MGF March, 18 2013, 4:43 / Reply

    Et je ne savais pas que Céline avait mis des beanies sur ses mannequins ;))

  • Valerie March, 18 2013, 4:46 / Reply

    Dear Garance, I am not sure if I have ever commented on your blog before but I want to thank you for this beautifully written and well thought out post. I own and cherish a fur I bought second hand in Paris but I am mindful of what I eat and what I wear.
    The problem today is , as you say greed, factory farming and animals not being treated with respect. Thank you for presenting a sensible view on the matter.

  • V. (encore ;-) March, 18 2013, 4:46 / Reply

    Oublié de te dire : je trouve absolument génial ton plaidoyer pour la qualité et la durabilité des vêtements.

  • florence March, 18 2013, 4:51 / Reply

    Garance je trouve vraiment très bien ce post tout en nuance et sans faux semblant. Chouette comme tout.

  • cricket March, 18 2013, 5:18 / Reply

    I love/we all love the way you work through an internal strugle with us Garance.
    I believe we are on a precipice. and around the corner is a world consuming with thought.
    The guilt we all drag about with us – where does our food come from, how are our clothes made, why are we building suburbs withoout thought and care – is helping to ignite the conversation.
    I believe this because in my community, people are loving their vegie patches. For me this was the first sign…!! The second in our supermarkets (supermarkets, wow that has to be another conversation yes?) are now advertising true free range eggs, because the consumer is demanding it. Go consumers. We did that!!!
    Thanks Garance, thoughtful and wonderful as per x

  • lola March, 18 2013, 5:21 / Reply

    Excellent post. Mais pour la fourrure : comment peut-on prendre son plaisir sur la souffrance de l’autre ? Comment justifier le superflu (car la fourrure c’est du superflu) sur la souffrance de l’autre ? Impossible en ce qui me concerne. Cela fait des années que je porte une veste de ma mère faite il y a quarante ans et toujours en parfait état. Il faut comprendre que l’on doit prendre soin de ses affaires, c’est ce sens là que les nouvelles générations ont perdu et commence à retrouver, la crise économique aidant à prendre conscience. Je pense aussi qu’il faut cesser de vouloir toujours payer moins cher nos vêtements.

  • Erin Cathleen March, 18 2013, 5:43 / Reply

    I really appreciate your thoughtful comments, Garance. I live in lovely, ultra-liberal San Francisco and wear fur on a regular basis: most often hats, but also stoles, coats and collars. Most are vintage, but some are new, and many of the vintage ones are “new” to me (not family pieces). It doesn’t come up a lot, but when asked I tell people honestly that I don’t feel the wearing of fur is different to the use of leather in shoes, bags, jackets, etc. which so many of us take for granted (or more so than with fur). Personally, I don’t feel moral qualms with this kind of use or this comparison. However, I have far more respect for those who abstain from all animal products than from those who want to tell me that my vintage fur hat is cruel but that their own leather belt and shoes are not.

    One thing I haven’t heard mentioned much in the comments on this or the previous thread is the effectiveness of fur as a material. As in so many other regards, nature got it right. There is simply no fabric that is both as warm and as relatively thin or sleek as fur. Synthetics just don’t breathe as well or must be far thicker to be as warm. I walk a lot in windy San Francisco and can attest personally to the effectiveness of fur as a material. I also own faux fur and love it, but there’s nothing like a mink coat over an evening dress to keep you warm on even the coldest of nights, or a fur hat to cover your (or I should say, my) short bobbed hair on a foggy day. Just as silk makes the best “long underwear” (as an animal product, where does silk fall in this argument…?) fur is one of the best warm-weather materials for both style and substance. Even if faux fur looks as good, we can’t produce something synthetically as effective as fur. Perhaps for the lady who is always in and out of a cab or car this is less of an issue, but for ladies like myself who so often spend time waiting for the bus and walking it is very important.

  • Chandra March, 18 2013, 5:49 / Reply

    We live in an inderdependent world, we can’t survive without other beings. Everything we need/have e.g., food, clothes, even love comes from the efforts and kindness of others. So we owe big time to the animals our planet & other human beings from whom we get everything. It’s one of the reasons I chose to be a vegetarian because at least I thought conscientiously about it like you’re doing Garance. Then at least me not eating meat will save the number of animals I’d have eaten from brutal deaths because animals have enough suffering already. I think the world be a better place if we all stopped thinking only about us. x

  • Katie B March, 18 2013, 5:53 / Reply

    This is why you are the best, Garance. Life doesn’t have to be all or nothing. But it should be well thought out!

  • Ariel March, 18 2013, 7:16 / Reply

    What a thoughtful, beautifully-written article. You’re spot on with this one, raising all the right issues. I come down in pretty much the same place on this debate. I’ve written about leather on my own blog, and find that it’s a very similar discussion.
    Longevity of garments is a huge factor in sustainability, and that’s the biggest pro for leather in my book. I’ve bought some synthetic shoes to try them out, but they’re just not as durable. There are even some companies producing “ethical leather” that comes as a by-product of ethically-grown meat and is processed with vegetable oils rather than harmful chemicals. I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts on the leather debate! http://www.heartsleevesblog.com/to-be-eco-friendly-or-not-to-be-eco-friendly-the-dilemma-of-my-new-boots/

  • Emma March, 18 2013, 7:17 / Reply

    This is so interesting. I commented on the last post and your response in this post I think reflects the complexity of our global economy and the million tiny decisions we make every day that have become an ethical and political minefield – I feel this personally and obviously many others do, too.

    These questions are on my mind alot, lately. I read Peter Singer’s ‘The Life You Can Save’ about poverty in our modern world and the decisions we can make in our daily life that can help others or impact others. How we can without very much effort make a huge difference. I loved this book and it made a big impact on me. But the thing that I struggle with is that, I am an artist. I can’t deny that. I can’t deny the inspiration or the desire to create. The desire for the beautiful and the sublime but I get the feeling – in Singer’s world there seems to be no room for that. It’s considered frivolous and meaningless and immoral. But the forces of Venus cannot be denied either. I think of a world without beauty and it would be unbearable but to many it’s an immoral extravagance.

    Late last night I watched the film ‘Cloud Atlas’. I couldn’t speak afterwards and lay in bed with my boyfriend holding me while I wept. Great beauty also reminds of our humanity and inspires us to do the best we can for others. This is how I felt about this film.

    How can we balance out and navigate this world of ours, with all it’s cruelty and beauty, meaninglessness and deep connectivity, it’s contradictions, it’s details and it’s grand scale. The only thing that makes sense to me is to take the chaos, the forces of energy and inspiration that come to us, the internal pressure that forces us to paint or photograph or write or politicize or form agricultural policy or whatever it is that you were designed to do. Beauty, Art, Fashion – the seemingly frivolous maybe it all has it’s purpose, too.Whatever ray of creation moves through you – I think just to be sensitive to that and express it as purely as possible and maybe it could form a piece of a puzzle brings some sense into this whole mess.

  • Emma March, 18 2013, 7:24 / Reply

    Hi there! PLEASE ADJUST MY NAME ON PREVIOUS COMMENT : Sorry – I think I used my full name in my last comment. I have a really uncommon name could you please just make it my first name? THANKS.

  • GB March, 18 2013, 8:05 / Reply

    Wow! Great post ! I have been thinking about this a lot lately as my 8 year old daughter is offended at my deer skin purse. After seeing a video about the way they get fur, very sad. Horrible in fact. I have fur but I refuse to buy it anymore. I dont even wear what I already have. We have 2 rescue animals, a bunny and a pony, and I think of them and where they were headed before we got them from the rescue. I do not wear or buy fur anymore!!

    As for the buy buy buy, I try not too ha ha! My husband and I bought each other beautiful cartier watched and have agreed that these watches are our anniversary gifts for ever and ever. And that is all we do besides a beautiful dinner and a great bottle of wine. And today is our day!! Married in Taormina years ago.

  • CREEZY March, 18 2013, 8:27 / Reply

    Garance : puisque cette discussion sur la fourrure est maintenant (ou provisoirement) terminée, vous écrivez pour conclure ce sujet à la fin de votre message que c’est “le style” qui est important….c’est pourquoi je réitère ma question : pouvez-vous nous parler de l’avenir de la mode, des nouveaux stylistes qui arrivent sur le marché – que proposent-ils exactement ? et nous montrer par des photos leur créativité.
    Nous connaissons les “grands” mais nous aimerions savoir ce qui se passe chez les plus jeunes…qui, pour certains, seront les “grands” de demain.
    Je regrette beaucoup que votre blog fasse l’impasse sur ces jeunes créateurs.

    J’espère que je serai “entendue” (ou lue)
    Merci

  • Chloe March, 18 2013, 8:42 / Reply

    Bien dit!
    Ça me rappelle la grand-mère de mon amie, qui avait vécu en Afrique dans les années 70, et en avait ramené un manteau de fourrure de léopard! Et elle se promenait fièrement dans les rues de Québec dans les années 2000… Elle en faisait tourner des têtes!

  • Margarita March, 18 2013, 8:48 / Reply

    The way I see it, nothing is ever given to us – we invariably take it from somewhere else. Be it a plant, an animal, a mineral. Personally, I just try to take what it enough and nothing more. Don’t succeed all the time, but at least I consciously try. Is it the right approach? No idea, but it puts me at peace with myself.

  • Hannah March, 18 2013, 10:29 / Reply

    If you don’t eat meat unless you know where it comes from, then why do you wear leather not knowing where it comes from???? I stopped reading after this.
    The leather you wear is a by-product of the meat you ‘don’t eat’

  • Elisabeth March, 18 2013, 11:04 / Reply

    Thank you for bringing such logic to this topic. On a hot-button issue, you have managed to be thought provoking without being preachy – or worse – bitter.

    Merci encore!

  • Julie March, 18 2013, 11:49 / Reply

    Thank you, Garance, and thank you, fellow readers, for your thoughtful opinions. Every day we have an opportunity to make a better choice, and hopefully to influence others to make a better choice in their day too.

  • Marta March, 19 2013, 12:10 / Reply

    Beautifully written Garance.
    I appreciated this post,
    xx.

  • Colony March, 19 2013, 12:34 / Reply

    Thanks for putting yourself out there like that. Very self-aware and thoughtful. Glad to see that the discussion remained civil, I love your readers for that!

  • Elsie March, 19 2013, 3:14 / Reply

    Garance, I enjoyed reading your post on a subject we should all consider and that is so divisive. I respect you even more now knowing your conscientious stand, and that it is mine too. I was also raised in french farm country, with chefs in family, and moved to the US, and these issues have followed me all along the way to this same view – c’est logique! Bravo!

  • Angela March, 19 2013, 3:26 / Reply

    A very interesting piece and a lot of very valid points listed here. I agree with your feeling in regards to fur and also how you feel about leather. Like you I am not one hundred per cent on one side or the other. Thank you for stating the difference between something many of are confused with and a topic I was in discussion about on Sunday afternoon – style and fashion!

  • carol March, 19 2013, 3:34 / Reply

    this was a well-thought out piece. I have to digest and will maybe write later if I have something intelligent to say in response. I liked the blue fur illustration in particular. was it done with watercolors or digitally? I was surprised to get that feeling of fur texture.

  • Elizabeth March, 19 2013, 3:47 / Reply

    Oh Garance, you are able to so eloquently and honestly articulate the many sides of any argument without being hypocritical and with a good dose of common sense! I personally welcome any discussion to think more deeply about the way we live and consume and the ongoing effects our choices have on the environment, people and all living creatures. We need not take more than we need and still be happy!

  • Megan March, 19 2013, 4:47 / Reply

    Garance, there is plenty going on, on this site, without worrying about what is new all the time. Your section about ‘what you can do right now’ or Scott’s pics that show ‘same girl, same coat, different look’ are really great and innovative. Have you seen the website
    http://whatkatewore.com/ There is always a mention of Kate wearing something she was seen in 5 years ago or she was spotted buying a pair of yoga pants, read NOT TEN or even three. She just buys herself a single pair. It is so refreshingly normal. Trust yourself, listen to yourself. That is the voice that’s important.

  • Alina March, 19 2013, 4:49 / Reply

    Je suis russe d’origine, j’ai commencé à porter de la fourrure très tôt, ce n’était pas mon choix, car j’avais à peine 18 mois. Il peut faire -50 C° dans mon pays natal. Aujourd’hui je vis en Europe et je porte de moins en moins des vêtement en fourrure, mais j’ai commencé à porter des blousons en peau lainée, ce qui est presque la même chose, mais l’aspect des vêtements en peau lainée n’attire pas beaucoup d’attention. Personnellement je trouve que la fourrure provoque la polémique à cause de son aspect luxueux et sensuel, mais c’est plus compliqué de s’indigner ouvertement contre ces aspects, c’est beaucoup plus simple de crier au et fort son amour des animaux, tout en continuant à utiliser des produit de beauté et des médicaments testés sur des animaux, entre autres.
    Personnellement je n’aime plus la vraie fourrure à cause de son aspect, et aussi parce que je m’en suis lassée un peu, je porte de temps en temps ma chapka russe en hiver quand je promène mon chien ( oui, j’aime les animaux, on n’est pas à un paradoxe près), c’est le seul couvre chef, qui me protège suffisamment contre le froid de l’hiver berlinois.
    Mais je ne suis pas contre le port de la fourrure parce que je suis profondément convaincue que c’est la SEULE matière écologique qui peut vraiment protéger du froid, (les plumes et le duvet, qui remplissent des doudounes sont à la base la même chose que la varie fourrure). La production des matières synthétiques est anti-écologique au plus au point et de point de vue global fait beaucoup plus de dégâts que la production de la vraie fourrure.

  • PlainJane March, 19 2013, 5:32 / Reply

    You are right, the hysteria needs to be taken out of the fur debate. I personally am completely against wearing furs and have no respect for those who do. I’m Ok with leather and sheepskin or any other that is a by product of the meat industry. After beig a vegetarian for 23 years I now eat meat so any other stance would be hypocritical. The minks, sables etc which are killed for their fur are only killed for their coats. This to me is a waste of life. when you also add in the amount of animals from the wild who are erroneously trapped and killed as part of the fur trade then I find it morally and environmentally unsound. I can’t help feeling that as a civilisation we shoudl have moved past this by now.
    The vintafge fur issue also dosn’t help. In the past people were slightly afraid of wearing fur (especially in the UK) as there was always the potential of having a pot of red paint chucked over you. Now with the popularity of vintage furs, with their somewhat shaky ‘green’ claim means that anyone can wear it without threat. The answer stop the fur trade so all furs out their are now vintage.
    Just as bad as fur wearers though in my opinion, are the people who get violent over this issue. yes it’s horrible but being aggressive and nasty will not resolve the issue only inflame it adn then you too have blood on your hands.

  • Yoanna March, 19 2013, 5:57 / Reply

    Très intéressant cet article. J’admire beaucoup Stella Mc Cartney, son travail et ses convictions, mais j’ai du mal à comprendre comment un sac en simili cuir peut être vendu à un prix exhorbitant?

  • ninotschka March, 19 2013, 6:02 / Reply

    Thank you so much! I totally agree with what you wrote and think! It is time to think about fashion in association with substainability in all it dimensions! That means all condition clothes are produced – including working conditions for humans, too. I don’t understand, how people can judge anyone for wearing fur while they are wearing clothes, that are produced under really cruel conditions for the human workers.
    And I think, if we discuss fur, we should discuss leather and meat, too. Killing an animal for a long time meant – and in a lot of cultures still mean – to use every part of it. That’s why discussing fur should go hand in hand with discussing leather an meat. We seem to forget this. When it comes to leather, me too. With meat I found a way, that works for me:
    A lot of people are irritated, when I tell them, that I knew the sheep my sheepskin rug is from. They are quite shocked, when I tell them, that I only eat animals I knew. When I tell, that I decided once to still eat meat only after the experience of slaughtering, they think, I’m cruel! But for me that was really important, because I realized, that you can treat animals in a good way AND eat them. And that I only want to eat animals with a good life!
    Friends of mine breed a small amount of pigs (“Bunte Bentheimer”, an old endangered breed, growing very slowly, not proper for industrial raising, because they are not efficient), who I visit, feed, clean and cuddle regularly. They are treated with respect and love and get tender loving care every day of their lives. A lot of them have names. When they are grown, we eat them – and that is OK for us and the only kind of pig we eat. Not although we know them, but BECAUSE we know them. We know, how they lived, what they ate (all organic!), and are with them, when they die. Besides, we help to avoid this kind of breeds become extinct. To somebody this might sound cruel, but it is true! We do it the same way with sheep and chicken.
    I would say, with food my philosophy works quite well, but with leather I’m terrible: I just bought leather pants for 300 Euros. I couldn’ help it, but my holistic plans were totally set aside by fashion… I hope, some day I can put it aside. Maybe visiting a clothing factory in vietnam could help me to improve – experience in slaughtering for the second time, to say so…

  • Ema March, 19 2013, 6:28 / Reply

    Assez convaincue par le témoignage de V. sur la filière fourrure.
    J’ai de la fourrure autour de la capuche de ma belle parka.
    Je porte la capuche tout le temps.
    J’adore avoir l’air d’un inuit. Je vais la chérir très fort et ne pas m’acheter d’autres choses en fourrure.
    On pourrait avoir un quota par vie ? Une capuche en fourrure et un manteau vintage au besoin retravaillé pour le moderniser ?
    Et ce serait tout pour tout le monde.
    Un compromis.

  • Ludivine Moure March, 19 2013, 6:38 / Reply

    Salut,

    Je suis extrêmement contente d’avoir lu ton article car je partage la même position et je ne sais pas si j’aurais eu les mots pour le dire aussi simplement.
    En grandissant je suis passée du “beaucoup de pièces pas chères” à “peu de pièces très chères” et je sais pourquoi, moi aussi je suis parfois hypocrite et j’achète des chaussures en cuir peu chères dont la matière première doit être tannée au Bangladesh…et je n’en mène pas large une fois l’achat fait.
    Mais je me soigne!
    Une petite remarque d’ailleurs : il est plus difficile d’assumer d’acheter peu de choses chères que beaucoup peu chères, car c’est plus visible et les gens n’ont pas l’habitude de dépenser autant d’argent dans une seule pièce.
    Je pense que les mentalités vont changer et que la prochaine génération consommera beaucoup beaucoup moins…mais mieux!

    A bientôt,
    Love from Paris,
    Ludivine Moure

    http://interiordesign-paris.com/video-showroom-nya-nordiska-paris/
    check out the video!

  • Noé March, 19 2013, 6:42 / Reply

    J’aime beaucoup quand tu parles de “respect de ce que l’on consomme”.
    Je crois que tout le problème vient de là : on sait que les premiers Hommes tuaient des bêtes pour se nourrir, mais ils utilisaient également leurs peaux pour survivre (il s’agit donc de se vêtir pour survivre à ce moment là, non par “beauté”) au froid. C’était une nécessité pendant la glaciation, aussi plus tard pour se protéger des insectes etc. Mais les Hommes à cette époque étaient une part de la nature, ils étaient animistes et la nature était une mère sacrée pour eux. On sait qu’ils représentaient les bêtes qu’ils tuaient, qu’ils les vénéraient… Ils ne les tuaient pas par barbarie, ils les respectaient, et leurs rendaient hommage que ce soit en peinture dans les grottes, ou par des rites.
    Maintenant, la manière dont on tue les animaux est une pure barbarie : il s’agit de faire du chiffre, tuer pour l’argent. Le respect a disparu, on voit les animaux comme des ressources, de vulgaire outils.

    On devrait effectivement apprendre à respecter les animaux, à se remettre totalement en question. On sait que nos ancêtres mangeaient de la viande à raison d’une à deux fois par semaine, mais avec l’industrialisation, on en mange TOUS les jours ! C’est aussi mauvais pour nous, que pour les animaux, que pour l’environnement… Mais on pense à tord que la viande est source de vie et indispensable à notre alimentation. Je suis moi-même végétarienne mais je ne blâme absolument pas ceux qui mange de la viande : oui la viande a bon goût et fait partie de notre patrimoine culinaire. Simplement, il faut comprendre que ce n’est pas le fait d’en manger qui est mauvais, mais la manière dont on la consomme : en excès, fabriquée dans des conditions douteuse, d’une provenance suspecte… Et on le voit avec ce scandale de la viande de cheval !!! Si les gens achetaient de la bonne viande chez l’agriculteur du coin, ils ne s’empoisonneraient pas, consommeraient raisonnablement et feraient un geste pour la planète.

    Donc c’est la même chose pour la fourrure : je suis effectivement contre le fait d’en porter de nos jours, car on sait que les animaux sont tués dans des conditions abominables sans état d’âme, sans hommage, juste de sang froid pour ce mal nommé “argent”.
    La différence entre avant et maintenant, c’est que les premiers Hommes ne savaient pas créer de nouvelles matières pour se vêtir. Mais maintenant, avec notre technologie, nous pouvons TOUT faire, vraiment tout, tout est possible, et c’est là une bénédiction comme une malédiction.
    Donc, pourquoi tuer des animaux si l’on peut faire des matières qui respecte l’environnement, la nature et les bêtes ? Je suis persuadée qu’on peut inventer une matière synthétique solide comme du cuir, ou des faux poils aussi doux qu’un pelage de lapin. Comme je l’ai dis, tout est possible, mais pour le fric et pour les industriels, les vaches et les lapins rapportent trop d’argent pour qu’un nouveau mécanisme plus économique et écologique détrône leur monopole. Le problème est là : on a toutes les cartes en main pour changer le monde, mais les “plus gros” se gardent bien de les jouer pour préserver leur propre intérêt. Qu’importe la nature, si eux sont riches ? C’est sans doute ce qu’ils se disent. Je crois que chacun doit étudier la question et émettre sa propre hypothèse, pour refuser ou accepter ce système de consommation. Les consommateurs c’est nous, tout peut changer grâce à nous.

    Noé,
    Couleur Spleen.

  • Johanna March, 19 2013, 7:21 / Reply

    J’avoue avoir du mal à comprendre ta phrase “Un animal d’élevage, élevé et abattu dans le respect, je ne suis pas contre.”…

  • Oriane March, 19 2013, 7:44 / Reply

    Très beau post, je partage ton opinion!

  • aly english-murray March, 19 2013, 7:54 / Reply

    hey garance,
    i love this illustration. what did you use? marker? pastel?
    the fur turned out great!
    - aly

  • Montserrat Salvat Velat March, 19 2013, 9:01 / Reply

    HI Garance;

    I really love your illustrations, they are very nice, simply, elegance, and more…

    Also your VIDEOS & posts!!!

    Congratulations 4 all!!! Hope some day I will do something; more or less, in the same way!!

    Mont.

  • Marina B. March, 19 2013, 9:08 / Reply

    Un super-article, Garance !!
    Je suis d’accord avec vous : il faut rester cohérent dans ses “revendications” : pas de fourrure, donc- pas de cuire, pas de viande. Il faut être honnête avec soi-même.
    Je partage votre point de vue sur la consommation “respectable” et “durable”. Et je porte mon petit manteau en lapin depuis 12 ans et je l’adore.
    Bonne journée!

  • CN March, 19 2013, 9:48 / Reply

    I bought a coat this winter with fur trim. After much debate about whether I should or not, I finally settled on getting it since I do wear leather and I eat meat. People generally are now more aware that the animals they eat do not come from quaint little farms where they were raised and killed ethically, yet still I naively assumed animals used for fur were caught, killed and then had their fur removed. I then came across the most horrific video showing rabbits, dogs, raccoons, and cats in fur farms having their fur ripped off their bodies while they were still fully conscious, screaming and struggling. A lot of the comments below the video criticized the people who worked at those fur farms, but the fact is none of that would be happening if there was no demand for fur.

    I agree with pretty much all of what you’ve said, especially buying less and keeping the things you buy forever, but when it comes to fur I’m not sure keeping it for a long time or forever would make me feel okay about it anymore.

    I felt horrible for days about having bought that coat, but what’s done is done. I can’t change that, but I have removed the fur trim and will not buy fur again. It seems that the more you see fur being worn the more acceptable it becomes, especially for people who are naive about where fur really comes from, like I was.

    Seeing the video really woke me up and I realized I make a lot of naive assumptions about the way things work. A lot of times it’s actually much worse than you could ever imagine. If you ever feel weak in the knees pining over something made of fur just google “Olivia Munn fur farms”.

  • Sascha March, 19 2013, 9:48

    Your comment is so amazing. I’m so happy you changed your mind about fur. Sometimes it takes an awakening to realize what’s really going on. Don’t feel bad about your coat – it brought you on the compassionate road! And yes, the Olivia Munn videos are great for making people see what’s really happening in fur farming.

  • Lo March, 19 2013, 10:07 / Reply

    I feel the same contradictory feelings as you Garance. I occasionally eat meat but tend to avoid red meat/mammals (weird philosophy, but they’re just that much closer to us!) However, I feel really badly about desiring leather and fur. I love the look of leather,and of some furs (more the garish, cartoonish colourful ones rather than any still resembling the real animal’s). But I have to ask, why haven’t more really good quality animal-free alternatives been developed? If Stella can do it, surely others can advance past that bad faux leather you see on H&M leggings.

  • Kaamiye March, 19 2013, 10:08 / Reply

    Chère Garance,
    ton article fait écho à un dilemme personnel.
    Ma grand-mère m’a récemment offert une veste courte en fourrure (renard ou vison, je ne sais plus).
    Je ne l’ai pas emmenée avec moi, pour plusieurs raisons : parce que je ne sais pas si j’oserai la porter un jour, si belle soit-elle (et elle est vraiment magnifique), car je sais ce qu’en penseraient beaucoup de gens. Parce que je suis moi-meme contre le port de la fourrure, à cause surtout des conditions d’abattage des animaux, bien que je sois une viandarde invétérée et que je me soucie beaucoup moins d’où provient la viande que je mange. Parce que si je l’acceptais, mais que je ne la portais pas, j’aurai honte de la vendre sur ebay (parce que c’est un souvenir affectif qui se transmet de génération en génération dans ma famille, et aussi parce que je n’aimerai pas être associée à la vente de vraie fourrure).
    Je ne sais donc pas tellement quoi faire de cette veste. C’est dommage parce qu’elle est vraiment belle, de qualité, et douce et chaude, et surtout qu’elle se vendrait un très bon prix, mais je crois que j’aurai presque aussi honte de la porter, que de la vendre, ou que de la laisser moisir au fond de mon armoire.
    (Mais ça pourrait être pire, le dernier manteau de vison que ma grand-mère a voulu me léguer quand j’étais ado et anti-tout a fini à Emmaus…)

  • Ana à Montréal March, 19 2013, 10:31 / Reply

    Merci Garance, ce genre d’article me fait retomber en amour avec ton blogue. Faire les choses avec conscience. On est plein de paradoxes et nos choix de consommation ont des répercussions sur notre monde. Ces choix peuvent être fait de façon éclairée tout en ne perdant pas le côté fun et créatif!

  • Sascha March, 19 2013, 10:34 / Reply

    Great post, Garance, so thought-provoking! Great work.

    I am a vegan, don’t wear any leather or use any cosmetics that’s been tested on animals. I don’t drive, either, for environmental reasons. Of course, fur has never been in my life because – and this is something people in fashion don’t know – THERE IS NO SUCH THING as “humane”, “sustainable” fur. Who is a “respectable” furrier? The animals were tortured and killed, no matter how you put it. There is no “humane” way to kill a fur animal. The only thing I can understand is vintage fur – obviously I’d never wear it, but I understand the thought process behind it. Maybe it was your mum or grandmother’s. Still, the message you’re sending is that torturing animals for a status symbol is somehow okay.

    I think we could all benefit from thinking with our minds instead of just following what’s in fashion. Just because something’s “back on the catwalks”, doesn’t make it okay. Remember that there’s a lot of money that goes into making a trend and fur suppliers have a firm grip on designers. There’s more than just creativity and style to the fashion industry – I’m sure you know that.

    And I am sorry, but fur and leather are NOT sustainable. They are very eco-unfriendly industries – aside from the making of the fur and leather, the farming of the animals is largely unsustainable and takes up lots of valuable resources. For those of you that argue that faux fur isn’t eco-friendly – check out IMposter or Donna Salyers Fabulous Furs – faux, kind and sustainable! Or, you know, do what I do and just don’t wear fur at all – also a viable choice.

    One of the laziest excuses people sometimes make is “but I eat meat, so why shouldn’t I wear fur?” IT’S NOT ALL OR NOTHING!! I’m a vegan for a million reasons, but I don’t think I should have to explain that food and luxury are far from comparable. Giving up meat is a big step, while not wearing fur is fairly easy. Meat is food, while fur is nothing but a luxury. Plus, I applaud meat-eaters and leather-wearers who say no to fur! Why not take that ONE step? Make that ONE commitment? It doesn’t make you a hypocrite – it makes you a compassionate human being.

    Garance, I thank you so much for opening up this discussion – you’re one of the few people in fashion that do. Thank you. And thank you for keeping compassion in your heart and thinking one step beyond the “fabulousness” and the trends.

  • Bee March, 19 2013, 10:34

    Sascha, thank you so much for this comment, especially for this:

    “One of the laziest excuses people sometimes make is “but I eat meat, so why shouldn’t I wear fur?” IT’S NOT ALL OR NOTHING!! I’m a vegan for a million reasons, but I don’t think I should have to explain that food and luxury are far from comparable. Giving up meat is a big step, while not wearing fur is fairly easy. Meat is food, while fur is nothing but a luxury. Plus, I applaud meat-eaters and leather-wearers who say no to fur! Why not take that ONE step? Make that ONE commitment? It doesn’t make you a hypocrite – it makes you a compassionate human being. ”

    I couldn’t agree more.
    With all my respect,
    B

  • Lotte March, 19 2013, 11:24 / Reply

    on our overconsumption: ‘la surconsommation’: http://vimeo.com/57126054
    quite scary.

  • PeachyLau March, 19 2013, 12:29 / Reply

    Tout d’abord, super illustration! et merci pour cette petite synthèse du juste milieux. Parfois il est bon de rester entre les deux et de ne pas avoir a choisir entre deux extrêmes. Je me plais bien au milieux avec toi.

  • Luanna Santa Rosa March, 19 2013, 12:50 / Reply

    Well…
    I was ready to write something about how absurde is to wear furs nowadays. But i completely agree with all that you said! Specially about the sustainable thoughts about timeless pieces. Buy less, buy better!
    I just became a huge fan of you! Really happy to see that we still have this kind of people in the world, with an inspiring life that has something nice and important to share with the others!

    Wish you all the best!

    X,

    Luanna

  • chromdot March, 19 2013, 1:28 / Reply

    i agree with you. we can eat/wear animals but with respect for other creatures and globe’s resources. But as I am wearning leather shoes I am not likely buying fur. It just seem “wrong”. I’ve recently read how animals are killed to be “kosher” (blood must be removed while they are still alive) and I was shocked. To sum it all up – it is not important if it’s fashin, religion or whatever. Making animals suffer is plain wrong and you cannot justify it by saying that “God likes it”. If you have to kill it you should do it fast and with respect.

  • DOMINIQUE March, 19 2013, 3:35 / Reply

    Pour moi, tout est dans la modération. Une belle pièce une fois ou deux par an, mais le truc immortel, genre manteau, tailleur, beau sac, etc. Après, on accessoirise. Mais le plus important, c’est de savoir ce qui nous va ou pas : une fille d’un mètre 50 ne portera pas la même chose qu’une d’un mètre 85. Les mains (longues ou carrées), les cheveux, les pieds (des chaussures blanches avec un 42, c’est limite, un 36, ça passe très bien), la longueur des jambes, etc. Et tant pis pour les taille basse qui vont à 1% des femmes, les strapless idem et j’en passe.
    Ensuite, être toujours “libre”. Ne pas être engoncée, boudinée, et tant pis si le 38 ne va pas, prendre le 40. Ignorer le regard de la vendeuse. L’allure et la gestuelle sont à ce prix. Encore plus importantes que ce que l’on porte : une belle pièce de couturier boudinée, ce ne sera que du boudin.
    Libre aussi de choisir par rapport à son teint. Etant brune, le kaki me fait entrer aux urgences immédiatement avec ma tête de déterrée. Il faut le savoir. Le blanc cassé ne va pas particulièrement aux teints de nacre. Bref, se regarder.
    Et que penser des achats compulsifs ? Que penser par exemple des escarpins Miu-miu qui ont fait rage la saison dernière, dorées pailletées. Qui oserait les porter aujourd’hui ? Elles ont duré 3 mois. Pour le prix, cela fait cher de l’heure !

  • Maritina March, 19 2013, 4:25 / Reply

    The more you write, the more I agree with you and love you!!

  • Catherine March, 19 2013, 4:58 / Reply

    I have been reading the Little House on the Prairie books with my daughter. I am struck (again–but I forgot the first time) by how little they wasted. They wore fur and leather and ate meat, but not a lot of any of it. One pair of shoes per year. Pa had a buffalo-fur coat that saved his life in a blizzard. They grew what they needed and bought very little.
    I am not so much against meat (though I eat very little) or fur or leather; I am against the incredible velocity at which we consume these things. I suspect that leather shoes are not only better for your feet but also better for the environment, since synthetics involve lots of nasty chemicals and, when thrown away, sit forever in a landfill without rotting back into earth. But how many shoes do we need? If you live where winters are brutal and you have a fur coat, do you keep it forever, or do you buy a new one every few years? Do you have several? I have a shearling coat, now more than 10 years old, which is incredibly warm, windproof and water resistant. It has every quality. But I don’t need two of them.
    I love your blog and Scott’s, but it’s not so much the sense of “what can I buy,” but rather the play of colors and patterns and the thought of people expressing themselves through their clothes–the thought of people making an effort instead of just being slobs.

  • Marie March, 19 2013, 5:06 / Reply

    Très bien écrit.
    Sauf que, Garance… la fourrure sans souffrance n’existe pas. La viande sans souffrance n’existe pas non plus. On s’en persuade, mais ca n’existe pas. Les fermes comme tu imagines n’existent pas. On est beaucoup trop à consommer de la viande aujourd’hui. Tout est fait dans un système industriel où les animaux ne sont que de la matières première. La catégorie socioprofessionnelle où il y le plus de suicide en France est…. agriculteurs.
    C’est dans la culture française de manger de la viande. On pourrait très bien s’en passer, pour certains c’est même plus sain. Par ailleurs, tuer un poisson n’est pas moins immoral que de tuer une vache.

    Et on ne tue pas pour manger de la viande depuis la nuit des temps! L’homme n’a pas toujours mangé de la viande durant ses différentes phases d’évolution. C’est ce que les vendeurs de viande veulent faire croire, protéines etc. Contrairement aux animaux, on doit la cuire, on est même pas vraiment fait pour en manger. (les nausées durant les 3 premiers mois de la grossesse sont un mécanisme de défense contre les toxines présentes dans la viande qui peuvent causer des problèmes aux feotus, plus sensible pendant cette période). Et aujourd’hui on a le choix.

    Pour moi viande ou fourrure c’est la même chose, ce n’est pas éthique de manger des animaux ou de s’en vêtir. Mais les manteau et les steak ne ressemblent plus à des animaux vivants alors ca passe.
    La fourrure m’a toujours choqué… mais je mange de la viande donc c’est de l’hypocrisie.

    Qu’on s’entende bien, je ne donne pas de leçon. Et cet article est très bien réfléchi, même si tu n’as pas toutes les informations (moi non plus très certainement). J’ai 20 ans, j’ai toujours consommé de la viande et du poisson, et un peu de cuir, mais en ce moment je commence à y réfléchir sérieusement et je me rend compte qu’on est complètement incohérent dans nos comportement avec les animaux.

    Je pense qu’il faudrait que l’on fasse l’effort de vraiment s’informer, de ne pas être manipuler par ceux qui ont un intérêt dans l’histoire, pour ensuite prendre une décision avec laquelle notre conscience est 100% à l’aise et s’y tenir.

  • Gabrielle March, 19 2013, 5:06

    Merci pour ta prise de conscience!

    Je viens de découvrir une vidéo qu’une lectrice de Garance a posté, et qui m’a fait passé de végétarienne à végétalienne quand je suis dehors et que je sais que les produits ne sont pas bio. Plus jamais d’oeufs ou de lait industriel!!
    Je crois que les gens continuent de manger comme ça simplement parce qu’ils n’ont pas la moindre idée de comment ça se passe vraiment.

    Je vois que tu as envie d’approfondir ta réflexion donc je me permets de te copier le lien.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMBIroMv6lk

    Bonne soirée!

  • Mona March, 19 2013, 7:04 / Reply

    MERCI GARANCE DE PORTER CE SUJET À L’ATTENTION DE TOUS TES LECTEURS!!!!
    Je pense qu’il est important de se demander d’où vient la fourrure que l’on achète tout comme Garance s’est demandée d’où vient la viande qu’elle mange. Je vis au Canada où par ces temps, les manteaux Canada Goose et Mackage avec collets de fourrure font fureur. Lorsqu’on se promène dans les rues de Montréal, on voit plus de personnes qui portent ces manteaux avec collets de fourrure que de personnes qui portent des manteaux réguliers sans fourrure. Je trouve la fourrure très jolie et j’ai pensé à maintes reprises m’acheter un de ces superbes manteaux Mackage. Cependant, j’ai décidé de me renseigner au sujet de la provenance de la fourrure que ces marques utilisaient. Malheureusement, j’ai vu à l’intérieur de ces manteaux une étiquette qui disait qu’elle provenait de la Chine. J’ai donc fait une petite recherche sur Google. En moins de 5 minutes, j’ai pu constater à quel point les animaux dans les fermes de fourrure en Chine étaient maltraités et torturés. Maintenant, à chaque fois que je vois un de ces manteaux à collet en fourrure, j’ai presqu’envie de pleurer. Je crois qu’il faut vraiment conscientiser la population à s’informer sur la provenance de la fourrure achetée et sur le traitement que ces animaux ont subi. À partir de là, on peut prendre une décision beaucoup plus informer

  • Gabrielle March, 19 2013, 7:04

    Merci pour ta prise de conscience!!
    N’hésite pas à partager cette info avec les gens autour de toi! Je suis persuadée que c’est par ignorance principalement que nous continuons à alimenter ce commerce. Si les gens pouvaient voir ce que tu as vu, ils penseraient comme toi.

    Si ça t’intéresse d’approfondir, je viens de voir une conférence qu’une lectrice de Garance avait recommandé et c’est assez génial. Peut-être juste patienter les 15premières minutes, mais après tu ne verras plus les choses de la même manière!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMBIroMv6lk

    Bonne soirée!

  • Clara SF March, 19 2013, 11:14 / Reply

    Garance, j’ai vraiment apprécié ce post, sans hypocrisie.

    Un article assez terrifiant dans le NYT d’aujourd’hui, sur la fausse fausse fourrure, où l’on atteint l’inimaginable – à savoir vendre du chien sous couvert de fausse fourrure parce que ça répond à la demande du marché US:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/20/business/faux-fur-case-settled-by-neiman-marcus-and-2-other-retailers.html?hp

    Je ne suis personnellement pas opposée à la fourrure, mais je trouve cette pratique choquante, évidemment. De quoi alimenter cette réflexion sur les dérives de l’ultra consumérisme.

  • suzy March, 19 2013, 11:27 / Reply

    i remember you asked us to submit suggestions once for your interviews – and I was (still am) very interested in knowing more about designers’ humanity. Are they using their influence to better the world beyond fashion/the arts – i.e. the environment. I really think the first brand to openly talk about their source of leather/fur/tanning process will be the brand to sell the most fur (granted they are in line with people’s beliefs).

  • Juliana March, 20 2013, 1:57 / Reply

    Garance, a balanced and well-thought through post. This kind of post sets you above the crowd – and its why I keep coming back each day. Enjoyed it so much. Well done!

  • annalucia March, 20 2013, 3:33 / Reply

    Thanks Garance! The thing is that so many people comes up with the sentence ” as long as the animal is treated right” it is ok to wear fur, eat meat etc. The problem is that NO animal on a fur farm is treated well! No animal in a cage feels good. That is where we have to start thinking in my opinion. ( I could go on with circus animals, zoos, horses driving tourist around etc etc, but as this is about fur, I’l keep it short. For those who are interested you read more about Kurakul, the most cruelest thing in fashion industry. I am also raised among animals as you Garance, in the country side, in the 70ies, where animals where treated with respect and care until the day they died. I am not sure that happens today anymore. And if I am not really really SURE where that meat comes from, or HOW that fox was treated before it was made into a fur collar, I better leave it and not assume things for the better! Also a lot of people defends themselves with arguments that ” Fur is so warm, and I live in a cold country ” Hmm, have you ever seen any of those polar expeditions ( who works in really cold climate for long time ) wearing fur btw? No, I thought so :D Have a nice day everyone. x

  • Kayleigh March, 20 2013, 5:56 / Reply

    There is an initiative called Origin Assured (OA) where each fur can be identified by where it came from and every other place it has been before it reaches the shop or auction you buy it from. http://originassured.com/
    Fur is a beautiful material and it is extremely unfortunate that animal rights groups have targeted the trade and tainted people views with graphic (and FAKE) images and video. I hope it does not stop you buying and wearing it.

  • Amanda Lee March, 20 2013, 6:49 / Reply

    hi Garance

    The fashion industry is profit driven and as a result, they will use a lot of raw materials that are sourced cheaply to make a huge margin. The producers of fur are not into animal welfare. I doubt few farm animals have been treated with respect when they are killed for their skin. It’s not just fur, there are shoes and handbags – leather products.

    I am not a vegetarian but I can choose organic food and free range poultry. This is not the same in the fashion industry. I don’t buy any leather products now because I am not sure if these animals are treated with respect.

    Designers should avoid using real fur and should make sure their suppliers are ethnical. Why, in the name of design, you should kill masses of animals for their skin?

    I like Stella McCartney and I think they should be more designers to make a stand of not using real fur.

  • Luiza March, 20 2013, 7:29 / Reply

    Great and sensible as usual, girl!!
    I havent been raised in a gourmet family, but in a high level sports people one. Basically meat is our natural source for proteins instead of those lab bars. I think my father would freak out if I ever become vegan, for example.
    I agree on the quality of leather bags and shoes. I’m not to the point of replacing them yet as leather can last forever. Also, most leather come from edible animals. With fur the problem is that normally the animal has to be slaughtered at first place just for the clothing purpose, once it must look flawless and an animal that’s been hit by a car on the road defo doesn’t look flawless. Then, who in the world eats those sometime tiny stuff? so basically all the rest is wasted, and to me that’s where relies the cruelty of killing for fashion.

    We have advanced so much in textiles, I bwelieve we came to the point of replacing fur for synthetics, but so far I don’t picture myself paying $$$$$ on Stella’s faux leather shoes because to me, faux leather does’n justify it’s price just becauseof the label in it.

    Well, i’ll never become a radical on that subject, I just try keeping reasonable and not distorting my principles due to fashion trends, and as a designer, never include fur on anything for a start.

  • ita darling March, 20 2013, 8:21 / Reply

    Garance- I am in agreement with conscious choices and responsible purchasing- weather for food or fashion.

    Just a comment however- I follow your blog religously and covet several of your pieces that you have highlighted in your posts- the red Kelly bag (!!!) and your fur lined army coat from Italian maker Mr&Mrs Fur.. does that not count as already “owing” a fur (even if it is just the lining?) I am not trying to call you out- but sometimes we forget about the things we already have in our wardrobe!

    Salud!

  • Raphaele March, 20 2013, 8:29 / Reply

    Moi j’adore la fourrure, mais je n en ai jamais achete, je n en ai jamais porte et vu qu’il fait tres chaud la ou je vis ce n’est pas vraiment une question que je me pose. Meme si le manteau en loutre de ma maman est la chose la plus douce que j ai connue et un de mes souvenirs tactiles les plus fort. Le truc dont le ne me suis jamais remise…
    Mes grands parents des 2 cotes avaient des fermes et j ai grandi avec les yeaux ouverts meme si Quand j avais 14 ans je suis devenue vegetarienne, a cause d un mouton que j aimais particulierement (c est moi le petit Prince) et qui avait fini en mechouis. Mais ca m’a passe, meme si je n’aime pas vraiment la viande. Pas pour des raisons ideologiques, ca ne me dis juste pas tellement
    Cependant ce sujet m’interesse enormement
    Je vois beaucoup d’hypocrisie autour de moi, ou meme pire d ignorance. Par exemple la nounou de mes filles est vegetarsienne par conviction ecologique: contre les productions de masse. Mais par contre allumer absolument toutes les lumieres de la maison alors qu il fait encore un peu jour ne lui pose aucun probleme. Pour moi etre vegetarien, le cuir la fourrure on met tout dans le meme sac ou on fait des differences c est du meme niveau…. Trop d’incoherences, de loopholes dans les theories des 2 bords (regarder un docu sur les abattoirs indonesiens et ce qu ils font aux moutons australiens (euh non je sais pas ce que j ai avec les moutons…c est juste un exemple) avant de les tuer pour leur viande c est du meme niveau qu un truc sur la fourrure) Il y a des choses plus importantes je crois
    Je n’ai qu’une conviction: d’abord on s occuppe des etres humains, par exemple on empeche les syriens d utiliser des armes chimiques parce que voir un enfant mourir comme ca ou Daniel Pearl egorge me choque beaucoup plus qu un lapin sans peau. D ailleurs il doit me manquer une case mais la cruaute je ne comprends vraiment vraiment pas. Donc on apprend a tous les enfants qu’il n’y a aucune excuse pour la cruaute, que la vie c est deja bien assez difficile comme ca donc rendons la vie des autres plus facile soyons tous gentils (peace and love, je suis en forme ce soir !!) et peut etre qu apres ca aidera a regler les problemes de cruaute envers les animaux etc
    Mais d abord l’humain et la planete. En priorite oui on limite la consomation de masse, on achete des choses bien cheres mais qui dureront tout une vie (ma montre cartier je t’aime) et on s engage pour changer les comportements plutot que de se focaliser sur un produit ou un autre

  • Marc Ferraz March, 20 2013, 9:47 / Reply

    Garance, I totally agree with everything you’ve said in this article. It’s not common for people to be so honest on the fur subject. As always your articles are a great and interesting read!

  • c2G2 March, 20 2013, 12:53 / Reply

    Merci V. pour votre contribution !

  • Inès March, 20 2013, 2:32 / Reply

    oh la, je trouve ça tellement intéressent ta façon de voir les choses ! Figure toi, que j’ai passé du temps à chercher des pièces que personnes n’auraient, et j’ai dépensé de l’argent dans ça. Sauf que.. Je les ai mis 1 ou 2fois max, parce que c’était tellement fou que je m’en lassé. Du coup, maintenant je cherche que des pièces basiques pour agrémenter mon dressing. Je pense qu’il faut mélanger la folie et le classique ou alors s’appelait solange knowles !

  • Karen March, 21 2013, 12:45 / Reply

    I’m at the same point in life regarding the ethics of consuming mass produced meat because of the horrendous cruelty involved. A friend has recently gone vegan and posts horrifying pics and videos of the treatment of animals on Facebook which I can’t fully watch they’re so awful. I have just given up meat, but not seafood, eating way more vegetables as a result.

    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could buy beautiful and quality made non leather shoes and bags? I would certainly jump at the chance to buy these products so I could give up leather forever. Hopefully this will be a reality soon. Keep up the great work Garance xx

  • Bow Savior March, 21 2013, 5:34 / Reply

    First of all Garance, thank you for sharing this particular opinion with us. It is a very sensitive subject, but there also comes the time, as with everything, that we need to answer even those. But I’d go one step further and say this kind of dilemma is being answered more than once.
    My relationship with fur started and ended when I saw a promo from an organization that advocates animal rights, involving raccoons.
    Since I believe in that saying that “you should be wearing your “dress” and not the other way around” we can safely conclude that personality equals style. Since my emotions on this matter are stirred and troubled, wearing fur is not just wrong for me, but I honestly believe that, however beautiful, it would not suit me at all.
    So it comes down to vanity :) I do want to be and look beautiful, and therefore, after this philosophical discussion with myself and you, hope it’s clear why I do not wear fur.

  • Lesley March, 21 2013, 10:48 / Reply

    Interesting post! How would you feel about possum fur from New Zealand? The possum was introduced into New Zealand in the 1800s. The conditions here, especially in the South Island, are great for them. Unfortunately they do huge damage to trees, especially native trees in the bush. Hunters kill the possums (saving the bush and native birds that live there!). The skins are usually tanned and turned into fur clothing. So would you wear a coat made from possum fur?

  • Cathy PERCEVEJO March, 21 2013, 12:34 / Reply

    Merci d’avoir lancé cette réflexion. Je me sens très concernée par les sujets abordés et ta pensée me semble très sensée, tant sur la fourrure que sur les habitudes de consommation.

  • Janneke de Jong March, 21 2013, 6:43 / Reply

    I love your honesty, Garance, and I think you hit the nail on the head.

    My personal belief is that as long as you do something, you’re doing something right. Some people might not eat meat but don’t recycle, others don’t wear fur but might be unkind to homeless people, a person might not buy any clothing which was made with a process that’s harmed the environment, a country or its people but won’t be able to afford organic meat, and someone else will be a total vegan, but travel the world (also a big environmental hazard).

    There are so many things we know are bad for the world and its people and animals, but on the other side, there are so many ways we can make a difference. Like you say, as long as you think about what you’re doing and how it’s affecting others, the world or the future, I’d say you’re on the right path.

    Love,

    Janneke

    P.S. I own one vintage fur coat and there isn’t a single piece of clothing in my wardrobe that I’ve worn and enjoyed more. I have plucked and gutted a pheasant and a duck once, and have never respected any meat that ended up on my plate more than those two beautiful creatures (I also made a feather headdress of the pheasant feathers, which my photographer friend used in a shoot). I run an online project where I give away clothing I don’t wear anymore for free and am continuously trying to buy less, but every now and then, the flesh is weak, and I just Have. To. Have. It. I make sure I always have cash to give to homeless people, but have never given money to an actual charity. I don’t like travelling myself, but because I emigrated, I do ‘force’ others to do so to come see me. I can do much, much better, but aspiring to be better is the engine of actual growth, right?

  • Ludovic March, 21 2013, 7:01 / Reply

    Bonjour Garance,
    Un simple commentaire pour vous dire que cet article m’a beaucoup touché. Non pas fondamentalement au sujet de la fourrure, mais le parallèle que vous créez par la suite avec les habitudes de consommation liées à la mode.
    Si des bloggeurs influents comme vous commencent à exprimer leurs questionnements concernant le rapport au vêtement, les notions de conscience, de style, de “slow fashion”, en tant qu’étudiant en style ça me redonne un peu d’espoir. Merci

  • el March, 21 2013, 11:49 / Reply

    to me there is not question. sure it made sense for early humans, who hunted animals, ate every bit of it, and then used the skin/fur. But, its not necessary anymore. Now its just cruel for the sake of it. i just dont think fashion is important enough to slaughter an animal over.
    its easy to make excuses when you find a really cute pair of leather shoes, but if you just think of the animal that had to die, the choice is so easy to pass it up.

  • Alice March, 22 2013, 12:30 / Reply

    Hola Garance,

    I am a 21 French girl and have been reading your blog daily for years. Thank you so much for this post! It is so good to see that someone as you – deep in the world of fashion – is questionning our consumer trends.(I am studying sustainable agriculture and Fair Trade management so I am quite at the other side of the chain – with the cotton production).

    Can’t wait to see where your reflections will lead to and to read next articles about this big but fascinating issue!

    Xx.

    Alice

  • D March, 28 2013, 8:11 / Reply

    Le style, c’est intemporel.parfait

  • Axelle March, 28 2013, 5:08 / Reply

    Je me retrouve totalement dans ton article, avec les mêmes questionnements et le même resonnement. Mais je souhaite plus particulièrement revenir sur un point, où l’on comprend qu’il vaut mieux consommer bien plutôt que consommer trop, et cette affirmation est primordiale. Avant je craquais pour tout et n’importe quoi, et depuis deux ans environ j’ai compri que ça ne rimait à rien! Primo, je me lassais très vite de toutes ces fringues qui s’entassaient dans mon placard, et secondo, j’ai compris que si je voulais m’offrir les vraies belles pièces dont je rêvais, il était préférable que j’arrête cette frénésie, que j’économise pendant quelques temps et à la fin, ma garde robe était composée de vêtements et chaussures que j’aime toujours et pour lesquelles j’ai toujours un immense plaisir à porter (sans parler de la qualité qui ne me lâche jamais). Il y a un an, j’ai pu m’offrir mon premier sac de luxe, celui dont je rêvais, et je le chéris comme la prunelle de les yeux! Et, par ailleurs, je ne ressent plus aucune envie compulsive de sacs… Car le mien me comble amplement ( pour l’instant en tout cas!) .
    Merci Garance pour ton formidable blog, et garde ta fraîcheur, elle est exquise!

  • Arlene Gibbs Décor March, 29 2013, 1:50 / Reply

    I know I’m way late to comment on this post, but I do hope you do open up a discussion about ZARA and other fast fashion places.

    Last night I saw yet another report about a place that makes their clothes. This time in Argentina on CNN International. It was very upsetting.

    This manufacture was charged with slavery. Yes, slavery as the “employees” couldn’t leave and were mostly trafficked from Peru. The conditions they were living in were horrific. The police took photos and there were clothes with the ZARA label.

    There is no way clothes can be this cheap without cheap labor. However, most people have no idea and some don’t care that the owners are making BILLIONS off the backs of the people who are not making a living wage.

  • Sue April, 21 2013, 4:34 / Reply

    I’m a vegetarian and also a fashion lover. For me it’s quite simple; fur looks best on the creature that was born and grew it. But just like you, Garance, I don’t hate people for eating meat or wearing fur but I detest the way we go about the meat and bi product industry.
    Animals are bred in masses and we waste so much of their product and we give them terrible lives and murder them cruelly and admittedly, I would no mind the use of animals’ meat and fur if we weren’t wasteful and we were respectful.
    Imagine a world where everyone understood that what they were purchasing was once a live animal and imagine how much better it would taste and the fur would feel if you knew that the animal had at least been happy and healthy while it lived.
    I guess I could seem like a hypocrite as I am a vegetarian who does not force others to become one but I just think we need to respect what we eat and wear and realise that they were all once living creatures.

  • VIRGINIE May, 9 2013, 4:54 / Reply

    Ca me fait vraiment plaisir de voir ce genre de remise en question sur ce blog (que j’adore :) ). Je pense qu’il est important d’être au courant de ces choses, et j’espère vraiment voir un article sur ce sujet. C’est terriblement immoral de feindre ignorer les conditions de travail inhumaines dans les pays pauvres, et d’un autre côté, dépenser des millions pour une communication totalement superficielle, avec des pubs remplies de célébrités et autres top models surpayées qui n’ont rien à faire là (H&M pour ne citer personne). Il y a déjà eu des scandales, il y en a en ce moment, mais ça continue. Je ne dis pas qu’il faut arrêter d’acheter des vêtements, mais comprendre que des gens sont exploités, se renseigner, faire passer le message, et essayer de se faire entendre par ces marques, c’est déjà un bon début.
    .
    Pour celles qui sont intéressées :
    http://www.ethique-sur-etiquette.org/index.php

    Voilà, désolée pour le ton un peu moralisateur du message, mais ce sujet me tient à coeur. :)

  • Amalia June, 26 2013, 9:34 / Reply

    Eh bien comme Stella McCartney (enfin je ne lui dois rien, c’est venu par moi-meme), je ne mange ni viande, ni poisson et ne porte ni cuir ni fourrure.. Logique jusqu’au boutiste mais coherente. C’est parfois complique, mais c’est possible! Et je suis convaincue qu’on sera de plus en plus nombreux a faire ce choix, et qu’une breche peut s’ouvrir dans le monde de la mode pour les gens qui partagent ces convictions!

  • Gennea July, 10 2013, 11:56 / Reply

    I don’t believe that I will ever buy fur. Although, I am not against fur altogether, in fact, I have inherited 3 of my grandmother’s 6 fur coats. I do intend to redesign and wear them though. Afterall, the animals deaths would not have been worthwhile if these coats don’t get passed down…

  • Bertille September, 12 2013, 7:28 / Reply

    Je tombe un peu tard sur cet article que j’ai trouvé très intéressant. Merci Garance pour ce point de vue sur la question de la fourrure qui remet les choses en perspective. Personne n’est parfait, et nous ne pouvons pas complètement nous passer des animaux dans notre vie. Pour ma part, je mange peu de viande et quand ça arrive, je vérifie l’origine (je vis aussi aux US …), je ne porte pas de fourrure, j’achète des produits de beauté végétariens et non testés sur animaux, et je défends la cause animale par certaines actions. Bref, j’essaye de respecter au mieux la faune car j’estime que nous n’avons aucun droit sur les animaux.

    J’avais cessé de suivre ton blog car je ne m’y retrouvais pas…j’ai l’Impression que je me suis trompée en te lisant aujourd’hui. À bientôt alors :)

  • Maria October, 1 2013, 2:55 / Reply

    RESPECT, ETHICS, SUSTAINABILITY: Those are some serious and very real issues we ALL should be thinking about when it comes to fashion. Creativity should work to “recreate” what we love from nature , rather than STEALING , pillaging, killing, forcing, brutalizing, obliterating natural resources for a TREND. We have to think ethically specially when the human population is still expanding. THINK then consume.

  • Irène December, 10 2013, 7:34 / Reply

    That’s why I am vegan..

In The Spotlight